Case Studies, Essay Example

1) Discuss Mr. Wu’s “crimes” and his punishment

Several state security and police officers raided Mr. Wu’s farmhouse. They used all means to access the house; they seized computers, documents and arrested him. Immediately, he was indicted on two blackmail charges. First, Mr. Wu was accused of obtaining knowledge of a contract between the dust control company and the steel company. He issued threats that he would use his alliances in undermining the contract unless the dust control firm gave him money so that he can keep quiet. Secondly, Mr. Wu was charged of extorting money from the Zhoutie communist party by using threats to reveal the problems of pollution. In 2006 March, Mr. Wu received payment from the committee on township party. This was meant to enhance tourism by advocating biased reports on pollution problems. Documents from courts confirmed that Mr. Wu received total of $5,000. In the following weeks, the prosecution revised Mr. Wu’s indictment. The prosecution dropped the communist party blackmail without providing any explanation.

A new charge was added on Mr. Wu; he was charged for fraud. The prosecution argued that Mr. Wu had used illegal means to support the Director of the steel company in developing false documents accounting for the money that Mr. Wu received from the steel company. Each of these three indictments held the claim that Mr. Wu had confessed to all the charges. While Mr. Wu was still in custody, Lake Tai called for assistance. Phosphorous and Nitrogen are the raw precipitates of chemical processes, sewage, and fertilizers developed to record degrees when experiencing short rainfalls.

2) What has happened recently with the case?

Mr. Wu was on the frontline in pressing the alarm about pollution of Lake Tai. He claimed that the root cause of the pollution menace had to be tackled. This led to the demotion and dismissal of five government and party officials involved in environmental work. Jiangsu provincial boss promised to thoroughly, clean Lake Tai with consideration of reducing the economic output of the province by 15 percent. This was followed by a threat from authorities who pledged that they would shut down thousands of some of the gorgeous polluters as they engaged in a sweeping industry crackdown. The evidence against Mr. Wu comprised his own confession and written testimonies. Mr. Wu’s request of summoning the witnesses of the prosecution to be cross-examined was rejected by the judges. The court held that because of Mr. Wu’s failure to provide evidence that police officers had tortured and coerced him, the confessions he made would remain valid.

This prompted him to lose his temper based on the claim that he had never committed any crime since childhood. Mr. Wu was sentenced to three years in prison. Immediately after his arrest, his former colleague, Mr. Hang released documents, clippings, and photos to journalists claiming that they were no longer useful. It had become extremely risky to engage in environmental work. Mr. Hang reported that he had recently witnessed little fish darting within the green milky water of the nearby canal. According to him, the white shrimp were almost resurfacing.

3) What is the status of Lake Tai?

Lake Tai is the third largest fresh water lake in the country. This lake has continually been a source of natural beauty and wealth for the residents of river Delta region. It has nurtured a bounty of whitebait, white fish, and white shrimp delicacies of crustacean known as hairy crab. Man-made and natural streams were a source of irrigation to a network of canals and rice paddies that were produced from wide and far distances. Poisonous cyanobacteria, commonly known as pond scrums converted the enormous lake into a green fluorescent. The stench of decaying is choking all residents who are miles near the shores of the lake. More than 2 million residents residing within the precincts of the canals, chemical plants, and rice paddies around Lake Tai have stopped cooking or drinking water from the main water source. This pollution rang an alarm bell to most residents who woke up in opposition of chemical firms.

CS Illegal dumping pollutes water

1) What was the incentive for this crime?

The authorities should impose pollution charges on these companies. These charges must seek to affect the economic behavior of these companies. They must be forced to account for the social costs associated with discharge of pollutants. Their have to choose between three choices; to continue polluting the environment while paying environmental charges, to cease operation or change their practices or technologies to reduce pollution.

2) How could it have been prevented?

Government authorities could set up weirs and dams to enhance irrigation, control floods, and disrupt the circulation of cleansing water. Chemical firms should be warned against discharging a combination of phosphates and similar nutrients of pollution in the surrounding environment. This is because such activities are likely to prompt the lake to eliminate oxygen needed for the survival of many lives that depend on the lake.

3) What will this cost and who will pay?

Yunnan Province Luliang Chemical Industry Co Ltd and the two truck drivers must take measures of cleaning the lake such as diverting portions of their economic budgets towards cleaning the lake.

CS China Admits Problems with Three Gorges Dam

1) Why is this “admission” of problems by the government so significant?

The government of China has come to admit that not everything is rosy at the Three Gorges Dam, which is the largest hydroelectric power project across the world. Government officials have released statements saying that problems have plagued this dam. The statements have highlighted problems such as ecological deterioration, geological hazards, silt accumulation and pollution, which yearn for urgent resolutions. Algal blooms had been witnessed along the dam.

2) How much money did the Dam cost to build?

According to figures released by government officials, the Three Gorges Dam cost the government approximately $8.3 billion. However, external experts have estimated that the costs might have been double this amount.

3) What are the other or full costs of the Dam?

The full costs of the Three Gorges Dam have been estimated to have been $32 billion. Even though external experts claim that the venture may have cost the government approximately $88 billion.

4) What are the benefits of the Dam?

The entire society is currently enjoying benefits such as power generation, utilization of water resources, river transportation, and flood prevention.

CS 11 Shennongjia exposes reckless development of China’s water resources

1) What dangers do the hydroelectric power plants pose?

The hydroelectric plant is likely to flood lands, deny farmers the right to their land, erode riverbanks and houses, kill marine lives, and divert sources of water for the residents.

2) How are the benefits and costs of the distributed?

The firm generates less power amounts, and the profits are shared among government officials while the environment suffers.

3) What would you propose to solve these problems?

For these problems to be solved I would propose that environmental impact assessments must be carried out on all operating plants; this may lead to closure of some plants. I have realized that there is no adequate supervision on the plants and some of the hydroelectric firms are operating outside the paradigms of environmental regulations. In addition, environmental policies must be put in place to regulate hydropower stations.

Chinese Dam Projects Criticized for Their Human Costs

1) List the general costs and benefits of the Three Gorges Dam.

According to figures released by government officials, the Three Gorges Dam cost the government approximately $8.3 billion. However, external experts have estimated that the costs might have been double this amount. The full costs of the Three Gorges Dam have been estimated to have been $32 billion. Even though external experts claim that, the venture may have cost the government approximately $88 billion. Despite the adverse problems brought about by the creation of the Dam, the entire society is currently enjoying benefits such as power generation, utilization of water resources, river transportation, and flood prevention.

2) Do you believe the costs or the benefits to be greater?

The Three Gorges Dam was a great project for the nation of China. So far, the project is generating benefits to the people of China in various aspects such as tourism, navigation, power generation, and flood control. River JinJiang has been experiencing a major historical problem of frequent flooding and this project has a primary of objective of controlling water levels. After its completion, it will effectively control water levels and cut down on flooding menace. Evidently,  the  benefits are great.

3) In your opinion, was this a worthwhile project?

The biggest Dam across the world is the Three Gorges Dam. Similarly, it is the largest ever built hydroelectric power plant in the world. Despite generating enormous electricity amounts, the Dam is a symbol of China’s developing power as a nation with the capability and ability to tame elements like no other country. This project was worth the cost.