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Mountain View HPP Program, Research Paper Example

Pages: 41

Words: 11170

Research Paper

Improving Health and Wellness for Residents at Mountain-View Assistant Living

Mountain-View Assistant Living has the ability to show that it cares about its residents by offering health promotion programs to improve their emotional and physical health. Senior citizens are at increased risk to suffer depression and are subject to certain physiological ailments such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, dementia, and diabetes. The program will provide residents assistance in achieving a healthy emotional and physical state by educating them about depression, their diet, and level of physical fitness. By providing this help, Mountain-View Assistant Living can make a positive impact in many lives.

Program Setting

Location

The majority of all three programs will occur within the setting of Mountain-View Assistant Living, located in Bandon, Oregon. Common areas, the gymnasium, the cafeteria, dining halls and beach-front will be required to sponsor activities. The majority of the depression program will occur in the common rooms and living areas at Mountain-View Assistant Living. Private rooms will be required for certain individual’s counseling and journaling sessions. Various locations within the community for residents to volunteer such as animal shelters, children’s hospitals, soup kitchens, children’s libraries and community-event sites will be necessary.  The cafeteria at Mountain-View Assistant Living will be required for providing at least one nutritious meal a day.  A common area for lectures and seminars and a kitchen for cooking classes will be required for the nutrition program.  Mountain-View Assistant Living will provide a space for exercise classes such as a common room, gymnasium, and a swimming pool.

Target population

The target population of this pilot study is senior citizens between the ages of 65 to 100 years.

Collection of primary data

The director of Mountain-View Assistant Living responded to a local advertisement for a study that offered the chance for retirement and nursing homes to improve the health of its residents and participate in a study that could benefit adults between the ages of 65 and 100. Mountain-View Assistant Living was selected for this study because the residents met the criteria of the target population and were in need of improvements in their emotional and physical health.

Planning/ Advisory committee structure and membership

The depression management program will be supervised by licensed therapist such as a psychologist, social worker, or counselor. The nutrition and physical fitness portions of the program will be supervised by health care providers such as a physician or nurse. A registered dietician will also participate in the nutrition program. Instructors and trainers who have had experience with the geriatric population will be assisting with fitness activities. Staff and volunteers from the community will be required to work with the residents and help coordinate and market the program.

Other members of the panel will include:

  • The Chair will be Madeleine Jacobs, the Director of the Mountain-View Assistant Living. Ms. Jacobs has a personal and professional investment, as well as her Masters in Gerontology. She will ensure the organization and operation of the committee and health promotion program.
  • The Past Chair, Michelle Corleone, M.D. will advise the present Chair on the affairs of the health promotion program.
  • The Chair-Elect will be James Emile, the CEO of the National Nursing Centers Consortium. He will learn the duties of the Chair and may serve as her replacement if she is unable to perform her duties.
  • The secretary will be Katherine Petrilla. She will be responsible for the organization of the health promotion program’s administrative and legal matters, and maintain records of the meetings. Her professional qualifications as a physical therapist will be an asset to the development of the health promotion program.
  • The treasurer will be Joseph Arendez, Attorney-At-Law, LLP. He will be responsible for financial oversight of the health promotion program. His duties will include funding, banking, and bookkeeping.

Stakeholders will assist with funding and coordination of the program. They are members of the community who have a vested interest in the success of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

  • Ada Greene has her Doctor of Psychology and will able to provide input on the direction of the depression portion of the health promotion program.
  • Michael Randolph is the President of Wyoming Oil, Inc. He has a Bachelor of Science in Engineering. Both of his parents currently reside at Mountain-View Assistant Living.
  • Rosa Johansson owns the local natural health food store. She has her Associates in Arts and will help to supply Mountain-View Assistant Living with nutritious foods for the health promotion program.
  • John Fuhrman is the Director of Delphi Automotive PLC, Tyco International Ltd. He has his Master of Biomedical Science, which may be an asset when making decisions as far as the health care of the residents. His mother was recently admitted into Mountain-View Assistant Living after developing the beginning signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Logic Models

See Figures 1, 2, and 3 for information on the visual interpretation of the health promotion program’s resources and inputs, activities and outputs, and the expected outcomes.

Program planning model that was used

The program planning model to be used in this pilot study is the Multilevel Approach to Community Health (MATCH) model. Subjective and objective goals will be recorded, and will be assessed at the end of three months.

Rationale

Assisting senior citizens in achieving health and wellness is an integrative process. Many factors contribute to healthy aging and both emotional and physical wellness must be considered. Mountain-View Assistant Living has an opportunity to benefit residents by participating in a pilot study which implements a health promotion program that manages depression, improves nutrition, and boosts physical fitness. By working with its residents, Mountain-View Assistant Living can improve not only their lives, but will also help to establish its place in the community as a caring facility.

Emotional and physical health are interdependent on one-another. Often, when people achieve good emotional health, they find that their physical health improves as well, and vice versa.

Depression impacts many senior citizens and can lead to feelings of sadness and despair, social withdraw, and may contribute to thoughts of suicide. When residents learn to prevent and manage depression, they will begin to feel more vital and energetic, have a more active life, and improve their physical health as well. Residents will be less likely to suffer conditions which are aggravated by stress, such as hypertension.

Therapy sessions can assist residents to achieve a better understanding over their emotional states. Sessions can help residents identify stress-factors and learn how to manage them. Setting personal goals, stating positive affirmations and journaling can help to alleviate stress and improve self-esteem.

Encouraging activities which promote cognition and social engagement will also help to manage depression. Mountain-View Assistant Living can provide resident’s opportunities to engage in volunteer work and host events such as card games, board games, and watching movies. The concentration required of these activities will increase brain function and the social support system will foster an environment of trust and encouragement.

Good nutrition is fundamental for improving health and wellness. It provides energy, nourishes the body, and benefits the immune system. By teaching residents to take charge of their nutritional needs, they can gain more control over their lives. Cooking and preparing healthy meals requires concentration and can help to improve cognition and mental clarity. Exchanging recipes can also be an opportunity for residents to engage in social interaction.

Nutritional deficiencies can mimic signs of depression. Senior citizens are at high risk for vitamin B12 which can create symptoms of neuropathy, dementia, anxiety, and depression. By addressing deficiencies in nutrients, common ailments associated with aging are resolved.

Exercise helps to prevent against disease and increases endorphins that boost mood naturally. It increases circulation, while reducing inflammation and chronic pain. By sponsoring activities such as athletic events and fitness classes, Mountain-View Assistant Living can inspire camaraderie and increase a social connection within the community.

Fundraising is necessary to support the success of the health promotion program. It can also be a great opportunity to improve the health and wellness of its residents. Activities that can engage the community are hosting dances, athletic events, health fares, and raffles. These activities encourage the participation of its residents, get them moving and engaging in social situations.

If this health promotion program is successful at Mountain-View Assistant Living, it may extend to other facilities as well. Mountain-View Assistant Living has the unique opportunity to not only be part of this scientific pilot study but to benefit the health and wellness of many people.

Purpose (mission), goals and objectives of the program

Residents will strive to achieve a set of personal and objective goals for the health promotion program. Goals will be selected by both the residents and the health care professionals and will be evaluated at the end of three months. Each program will have a series of objectives that will help to measure the program’s progress and will be used to coordinate its future success.

Goals

At the beginning of the program, residents will select a personal goal to achieve by the end of three months, such as walking one mile. The goal of the depression portion of the program is to help the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living achieve a better emotional state and improve their management of feelings associated with depression. The goal of the nutrition portion is to use diet to promote a better quality of life and promote longevity for the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living. The goal of the fitness portion is to promote physical fitness to increase function, boost, energy, and reduce pain and inflammation for the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

Objectives

Three objectives will be attempted in the depression program. After the initial orientation, residents will take a brief quiz to better understand their current emotional state. Skills in stress management and conflict resolution will be implanted by residents creating affirmations, participating in therapy, and creating a journal to record their thoughts and feelings. Residents will create an affirmation to be repeated daily by the end of the first week. Residents will be evaluated by the therapists using both subjective and objective findings, and the results are anticipated to improve by 25% at the end of three months.

Three objectives will be attempted in the nutrition program. After the initial orientation, residents will take a quiz on nutrition standards set by the USDA. At the end of three months, residents will take another quiz and results will be compared. Another objective to be met in three months is for residents to be able to plan and prepare meals according to their dietary plans. Residents will be evaluated by the health care practitioners using both subjective and objective findings, and the results will are anticipated to improve by 25% at the end of three months.

Three objectives will be attempted in the fitness program. After the initial orientation, residents will be able to find their radial pulse and take their heart rate. Another objective to be met in three months is for residents to be able to exercise on their own at least three times per week. Residents will be evaluated by the health care practitioners using both subjective and objective findings, and the results are anticipated to improve by 25% at the end of three months.

Description of the interventions, intervention activities, and behavior

All three programs of this pilot study will be a micro intervention and a direct intervention, as each works directly with individual residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living on a personal level.

Initial orientation

To begin the health promotion program, there will be an orientation providing information about managing depression, nutrition, and physical fitness. After the orientation, residents will take two brief quizzes: one to quickly gauge their current emotional state, and another to test their nutritional knowledge based on USDA standards. Results of the nutrition quiz will be compared to a second quiz to be taken at the end of three months. Residents will also be able to find their radial pulse and measure their own heart rate for a period of 60 seconds.

Depression program

By the end of the first week of the depression program, residents will have created at least one affirmation to repeat daily throughout the first three months.Examples may be “I am healthy and vital” or “I am content.”Therapists will divide residents into either group therapy or individual treatment sessions. In these sessions, residents will identify stress-factors and create ways to resolve them. Residents will be encouraged to keep a journal regarding their thoughts and feelings. Subjective questionnaires chosen by the licensed therapist(s) will be administered to assess each resident’s emotional progress monthly. Residents will be evaluated by the therapists according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). Results are anticipated to improve by 25% in three months.

  • Residents will take a brief quiz analyzing their self-esteem and perception of stress after initial orientation to gauge emotional state. Stress-factors will be identified and conflict resolution for stressful situations will be taught as instructional intervention.
  • Individual or group therapy will be offered to residents weekly by the licensed therapist to help manage their depression, offering both social support and counseling.
  • Journaling and repeating affirmations will promote emotional health as instructional intervention.
  • Residents will have the opportunity to volunteer with various activities such as animal shelters, soup kitchens, children’s hospitals and libraries. This intervention implements social support and environmental change. By helping those less fortunate, residents will be able to see the positive impact that they have on the lives of others.
  • For residents who have difficulty leaving the facility, therapy dolls may be used. This activity will promote nurturing, self-esteem, and social interaction. Residents facing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease will especially benefit.
  • Activities which promote cognitive awareness such as playing cards, checkers, BINGO, and movie night will be offered to residents. Social support and relationships among the residents will be fostered and contribute to a positive environmental change.
  • Subjective questionnaires assessing stress-management and overall happiness will be selected by the therapists to assess residents’ monthly progress. These questionnaires are examples of counseling intervention.
  • Residents will be evaluated by the therapists according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR).

Nutrition program

Throughout the nutrition program, residents will have their progress monitored. Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice and administered once a month. Objective progress will be monitored with blood pressure readings, weight, and samples of hair and saliva. Blood pressure and weight will be measured weekly and hair and saliva samples will be measured every two weeks. At the end of three months, total progress will be calculated and a 25% improvement in the results is anticipated. Residents will also be able to plan and prepare simple meals according to their diet plans after the three month evaluation.

  • The cafeteria will provide residents with at least one nutritious meal per day, according to USDA standards and modified by recommendations made by the health care providers. By improving the nutrition of its residents, Mountain-View Assistant Living will implement a positive environmental change.
  • Educational materials on healthy eating habits such as brochure, pamphlets, and healthy recipes, established by the USDA, will provide residents with instructional intervention.
  • Lectures, educational seminars, and cooking classes will beoffered at the facility every two to three weeks. This instructional intervention will implement social support and environmental change.
  • At the end of orientation, residents will take a brief quiz, testing their nutritional knowledge. Results of this quiz will be compared in another taken at the end of three months. This instructional intervention can be a fun way to assess how much they have learned.
  • Residents will write down one personal goal they wish to achieve in a period of three months. Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice. This will be instructional intervention and can be included in counseling.
  • Residents will be able to plan and prepare simple meals according to their diet plans after the three month evaluation.
  • Objective progress will be monitored with blood pressure readings, weight, and samples of hair and saliva. This will be part of counseling andMountain-View Assistant Living will use the data collected to improve the nutritionand physical health of its residents.

Fitness program

Residents may participate in activities according to their comfort level and the recommendations made by the health care provider(s). Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice and administered once a month. Blood pressure, weight, and samples of hair and saliva will be required; these readings will be shared with the data of nutrition program. In addition, grip strength, lung capacity, and heart rate will be assessed once a week.  At the end of three months, total progress will be calculated and a 25% improvement in the results is anticipated. Residents will also be able to perform their exercise program on their own at least three times per week.

  • Activities for fitness will include water exercises, Yoga, Tai Chi, light impact aerobics and strength training. These exercises will foster social support, instructional intervention, and environmental change. Group exercise programs will strengthen relationships and increase physical health, promoting a more positive energy at Mountain-View Assistant Living.
    • An instructional implementation will teach residents to locate their radial pulse and take their own heart rate for a period of 60 seconds.
    • Residents will also be able to perform their exercise program on their own at least three times per week. The instructional intervention will promote an environmental change.The ability to perform exercises independently will increase residents’ physical fitness and allow for class time to be devoted to more challenging materials. Residents may have more energy to exercise outside of the community, allowing for more social interaction and positive promotion of Mountain-View Assistant Living.
    • Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice and administered once a month. These questionnaires will be part of counseling and can contribute to environmental change.Mountain-View Assistant Living will be able to use this data to evaluate and make improvements on the physical health of its residents.
    • Objective progress will be measure by blood pressure readings, weight, samples of hair and saliva, grip strength, breathing capacity, and heart rate. This will be part of counseling and can contribute to environmental change.The data collected will allow Mountain-View Assistant Living to benefit its residents’ fitness levels and make improvements with their physical health.

Participation achievement ceremony

At the end of the study, a dance will be held to celebrate the achievements of the residents who participated. Scores will be tallied and the person who has made the most progress will be awarded with a trophy and a gift card for $100 to the restaurant or store of their choosing.

Informed Consent

Informed consent will be required for documentation stating that residents willingly participated in Mountain-View Assistant Living’s health promotion program. Residents will be making lifestyle changes at the advice of licensed therapists and health care professionals; these changes will impact their eating habits and physical activities, potentially exacerbating pre-existing conditions or creating injury. Documentation will also be necessary to ensure HIPAA regulations and privacy policies are met.

Modification/change theory

The social cognitive theory is the modification theory that was used for this health promotion program. Residents will benefit as this modification theory focuses on helping them to better understand their emotional and physical health at an interpersonal level. Residents will increase their skills in managing depression and stress, improving nutrition, and boosting physical fitness. By working with the interdependence of emotional and physical health, residents can better understand their roles in shaping their well-being.

A detailed description of the entire health promotion program plan

Needs/Assessment

The program will improve the emotional and physical health of the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living. Senior citizens have a higher chance of experiencing health problems such as depression, hypertension, osteoporosis, and chronic pain. By promoting better emotional well-being and implementing healthy strategies for diet and exercise, residents can improve their health and wellness and enjoy a better quality of life.

By helping its residents, both the community and Mountain-View Assistant Living will

benefit from projected changes. Residents will able to take active roles in the community, which will result in increased funding for the center. Mountain-View Assistant Living will establish a solid reputation as a caring and cutting-edge facility and have an increased retention of satisfied residents.

Depression program

Senior citizens are at high risk for developing depression. Certain factors may contribute to this such as loss of friends and family, loneliness, and inability to engage in their favorite activities. Sometimes they may feel like a burden or neglected by their families. Depressed senior citizens may experience feelings of sadness and anxiety, become withdrawn and isolated, and may even contemplate suicide.

Progress for the management of depression will be monitored by licensed therapists, such as psychologists, social workers, and counselors. Residents will be encouraged to undergo either group or individual counseling. In these sessions, they will learn how to better understand their feelings and in three months, will be better able to resolve and navigate stressful situations. By the end of the first week of the program, residents will have created at least one affirmation to repeat daily and will be encouraged to keep a journal to record their thoughts and feelings.  Questionnaires recommended by therapists will be administered once a month and results of DSM-IV-TR will be evaluated after three months. A large part of the data will be subjective, as the health promotion program is designed to help residents on a personal level.

Nutrition program

Senior citizens have specific nutritional needs which must be addressed.  Deficiencies in essential vitamins and nutrients can mimic certain disease patterns. For example, symptoms of dementia and chronic neuropathy can often be resolved with a simple B12 injection. The right combination of calcium, vitamin D, and magnesium can strengthen bones and help to prevent fractures.

Progress will be monitored and evaluated by a health care provider such as a physician, nurse, or registered dietitian. Blood pressure, weight, and samples of hair and saliva will be recorded and evaluated by the health care provider. Staff will also be required to market any fundraising programs and to promote awareness in the community. Kitchen staff will need to be trained in how to prepare nutritious meals according to recommended dietary guidelines. Purchasing local foods from farmer’s markets can reduce costs and establish a community presence. Data will consist of subjective questionnaires selected by the health care provider(s) and objective results of blood pressure, weight, and samples of hair and saliva. This data will be analyzed by the health care provider(s) and summarized in a report that will include charts showing improvement in statistical readings. The report will be an ongoing process and will be reviewed after three consecutive months.

Fitness program

Achieving physical fitness is important for senior citizens. Adequate strength, flexibility, and good balance help to increase energy, health of the entire body, and prevent falls. Regular exercise also helps to improve memory and may alleviate stress and depression.

Patient progress will be monitored and evaluated by health care professionals such as a physician or nurse. Blood pressure, samples of hair and saliva, heart rate, weight, lung capacity, and grip strength will be recorded and evaluated by the health care provider. Certified instructors of Yoga, Tai Chi, strength training and aerobics, and swimming instructors who specialize in geriatric health will be required. Staff will be required to market the fitness program in the community and help with fundraising. Residents will have access to free weights, floor mats, and resistance bands. Local gyms and fitness centers can be contacted for equipment donations or discounted sales. Local chapters of Silver Sneakers, the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), and the American Geriatric Association can be contacted for assistance. Data will consist of subjective questionnaires selected by the health care provider(s) and objective results of blood pressure, weight, heart rate, grip strength, lung capacity, and samples of hair and saliva. This data will be analyzed by the health care provider(s) and summarized in a report that will include charts showing improvement in statistical readings.  The report will be an ongoing process of evaluation and will be reviewed after three consecutive months.

Planning/advisory committee structure and membership

The depression management program will be supervised by a licensed therapist such as a psychologist, social worker, or counselor. The nutrition and physical fitness portions of the program will be supervised by health care provider(s) such as a physician or nurse. A registered dietician will also participate in the nutrition program. Instructors and trainers who have had experience with the geriatric population will be assisting with fitness activities. Staff and volunteers from the community will be required to work with the residents and help coordinate and market the program.

Stakeholders will assist with funding and coordination of the program. They are members of the community who have a vested interest in the success of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

  • Ada Greene has her Doctor of Psychology and will able to provide input on the direction of the depression portion of the health promotion program.
  • Michael Randolph is the President of Wyoming Oil, Inc. He has a Bachelor of Science in Engineering. Both of his parents currently reside at Mountain-View Assistant Living.
  • Rosa Johansson owns the local natural health food store. She has her Associates in Arts and will help to supply Mountain-View Assistant Living with healthy foods.
  • John Fuhrman is the Director of Delphi Automotive PLC, Tyco International Ltd. He has his Master of Biomedical Science, which may be an asset when making decisions as far as the direction of health care of the residents. His mother was recently admitted into Mountain-View Assistant Living after developing the beginning signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Logic models

Logic model charts will be used to display the combined goals for improving the emotional and physical health of the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living. See Figures 1, 2, and 3 for information on the visual interpretation of the health promotion program’s resources and inputs, activities and outputs, and the expected outcomes.

Program planning model

The program planning model to be used in this pilot study is the Multilevel Approach to Community Health (MATCH) model. Subjective and objective goals will be recorded, and will be assessed at the end of three months.

Methods for gaining executive support

Fundraising will be essential in the program’s success. Financial resources among residents will vary. While insurance companies may provide some assistance, their coverage for preventative health care is often limited. Marketing will be necessary to encourage community involvement and inspiring residents’ families to participate.

  • Local chapters of Silver Sneakers, AARP, and the American Geriatric Association may be contacted for assistance.
  • Mountain-View Assistant Living will need to establish a community presence by hosting health fares, cooking classes, and inviting health care professionals to have lectures and seminars.
  • Fundraising opportunities will encourage residents’ participation and may consist of hosting community dances, charity auctions, raffles, and athletic events.

Purpose (mission), goals, and objectives

Residents will strive to achieve a set of goals to achieve for the health promotion program. Goals will be selected by the residents; they will receive assistance and advice by the licensed therapists and health care professionals. The achievement of goals will be evaluated at the end of three months. Each program will have a series of objectives that will help to measure the success of the program and will be used to coordinate its future success.

  • At the beginning of the program, each resident will create a personal goal to achieve by the end of the three months. Examples may include performing ten push-ups or going out dancing.
  • The goal of the depression portion of the program is to help the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living achieve a better emotional state and improve their management of feelings associated with depression.
  • The goal of the nutrition portion is to use diet to promote a better quality of life for the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living.
  • The goal of the fitness portion is to promote physical fitness to increase function, boost, energy, and reduce pain and inflammation for the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

The depression program consists of three objectives.

  • At the end of the initial orientation, residents will take a brief quiz to gauge their emotional state.
  • Residents will have better skills at stress-management and conflict resolution skills at the end of three months.
  • Results for subjective and objective findings by the licensed therapists will be improved by 25% at the end of three months.
    • Subjective questionnaires will be provided monthly.
    • Objective results should improve by the DSM-IV-TR evaluation.

The nutrition program consists of three objectives.

  • At the end of initial orientation, residents will be able to pass a nutrition quiz based on USDA guidelines. They will take another quiz at the end of three months to see their improvement.
  • By the end of the program, residents will be able to plan and prepare simple meals.
  • Subjective and objective data results will show 25% improvement by the end of three months.
    • Subjective questionnaires will be provided monthly.
    • Objective data will include blood pressure readings, weight, and samples of hair and saliva.
  • The fitness program consists of three objectives.
    • After the initial orientation, residents will be able to find their radial pulse and take their heart rate for a period of 60 seconds.
    • Residents will be able to perform exercises on their own at least three times per week by the end of three months.
    • Subjective and objective data results will show a 25% improvement at the end of three months.
      • Subjective questionnaires will be provided monthly.
      • Objective data will include blood pressure readings, weight, samples of hair and saliva, lung capacity, heart rate, and grip strength.

Interventions, intervention activities, and behavior modification/change

Interventions

The interventions of the health promotion program will be on a personal level. All three programs consist of micro intervention and direct intervention, as each works directly with individual residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living. Other interventions tactics will be implement instruction and education, counseling, social support, and environmental change.

Intervention activities

Initial orientation

To begin the health promotion program, there will be an orientation providing about managing depression, improving nutrition, and physical fitness. After the orientation, residents will take a quiz to quickly gauge their current emotional state, and other that will test their nutritional knowledge based on USDA standards. Results of the nutrition quiz will be compared in another taken at the end of three months. Residents will also be able to find their radial pulse and measure their own heart rate for a period of 60 seconds.

Depression program

By the end of the first week of the depression program, the residents will have created at least one affirmation to repeat daily and for the first three months of the health promotion program. Therapists will divide residents into either group therapy or individual treatment sessions. In these sessions, residents will identify stress-factors and ways to resolve them. They will be encouraged to keep a journal regarding their thoughts and feelings. Questionnaires chosen by the licensed therapist(s) will be administered to assess each resident monthly. Residents will be evaluated by the therapists according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). Results will be improved by 25% in three months.

  • Residents will take a brief quiz analyzing their self-esteem and perception of stress after initial orientation to gauge emotional state. This activity will contribute to instructional intervention and counseling.
  • Individual or group therapy will be offered to residents weekly by the licensed therapist to help them manage their depression, offering both social support and counseling.
  • Stress-factors will be identified and conflict resolution for stressful situations will be taught as instructional intervention.
  • Journaling and affirmations designed to promote emotional health is an example of instructional intervention.
  • Residents will have the opportunity to volunteer with various activities such as animal shelters, soup kitchens, and children’s hospitals. Residents will be able to see their positive impact on the lives of others and encourage the development of social relationships. This intervention implements social support and environmental change. Residents will be able to benefit the outside community and increase awareness of the progress being achieved at Mountain-View Assistant Living.
  • Therapy dolls will be used to promote cognition, self-esteem, and social interaction in a nurturing environment. This activity will be beneficial for residents who cannot leave the facility and for those with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.
  • Activities which promote cognitive awareness such as playing cards, checkers, BINGO, and movie night will be offered to residents. Social support and relationships among the residents will be fostered and contribute to a positive environmental change.
  • Subjective questionnaires assessing stress-management and overall happiness chosen by therapists will be assessed monthly to monitor residents’ progress. These questionnaires are examples of counseling intervention and contribute to environmental change. The subjective data collected will be used to implement improvements on the emotional health of the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living.
  • Residents will be evaluated by the therapists according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). These results will be part of counseling and contribute to environmental change.The objective data collected will be used to implement improvements on the emotional health of the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

Nutrition program

Throughout the nutrition program, residents will have their progress monitored. Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice and administered once a month. Objective progress will be monitored with blood pressure readings, weight, and samples of hair and saliva. Blood pressure and weight will be measured weekly and hair and saliva samples will be measured every two weeks. At the end of three months, total progress will be calculated and a 25% improvement in the results is anticipated. Residents will also be able to plan and prepare simple meals according to their diet plans after the three month evaluation.

  • Residents will have access to educational materials such as brochures and pamphlets on healthy eating habits established by the USDA will provide residents with instructional intervention. Lectures, educational seminars, and cooking classes may be offered at the facility every two to three weeks.
    • The cafeteria will provide residents with at least one nutritious meal per day, according to USDA standards and recommendations made by health care providers. This will implement an environmental change to Mountain-View Assistant Living and its residents.
    • At the end of orientation, residents will take a brief quiz, testing their nutritional knowledge. Results of this quiz will be compared in another taken at the end of three months. This instructional intervention can be a fun way to assess how much they have learned.
    • Residents will write down one personal goal they wish to achieve in a period of three months. This instructional intervention can be included in counseling.
    • Residents will be able to plan and prepare simple meals according to their diet plans after the three month evaluation. This instructional intervention will also be part of an environmental change in the lives of the residents.
    • Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice. These questionnaires will be part of counseling and can contribute to environmental change.Data collected will be used by Mountain-View Assistant Living to improve the health of its residents.
    • Objective progress will be monitored with blood pressure readings, weight, and samples of hair and saliva. This will be part of counseling and can contribute to environmental change. Clinical findings will be used to make improvements in the health of the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

Fitness program

Residents may participate in activities according to their comfort level and recommendations by the health care provider(s). Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice and administered once a month. Blood pressure, weight, and samples of hair and saliva will be required; readings may be used from the nutrition program. In addition, grip strength, breathing capacity, and heart rate will be assessed once a week.  At the end of three months, total progress will be calculated and a 25% improvement in the results is anticipated. Activities for fitness will include water exercises, Yoga, Tai Chi, light impact aerobics and strength training. These exercises will foster social support, instruction, and environmental change.By improving their physical health, residents will be able to take a more active role in Mountain-View Assistant Living and within the community.

  • An instructional implementation will teach residents to locate their radial pulse and take their own heart rate for a period of 60 seconds.
  • Residents will also be able to perform their exercise program on their own at least three times per week. The instructional intervention will promote an environmental change.Residents will be able to devote class time to more challenging activities, and improve their fitness levels at an increased rate. Residents may also elect to practice one exercise program independently, such as Yoga while simultaneously taking a class in Tai Chi.
  • Subjective progress will be monitored by questionnaires of the health care provider’s choice and administered once a month. These questionnaires will be part of counseling and can contribute to environmental change. The subjective data collected will allow Mountain-View Assistant Living to monitor the physical progress of its residents to improve their physical health.
  • Objective progress will be measure by blood pressure readings, weight, samples of hair and saliva, grip strength, breathing capacity, and heart rate. This will be part of counseling and can contribute to environmental change. Mountain-View Assistant Living can use the objective data collected to implement improvements on the physical health of its residents.

Participation award ceremony

At the end of the three month study, residents will be given a dance to celebrate their achievements. The person showing the most improvement in their scores will be awarded a trophy and a $100 gift card to the restaurant or store of their choosing.

Behavior modification/change

The social cognitive theory is the modification theory that was used for this health promotion program. Residents will benefit as this modification theory will enable them to better understand their emotional and physical health at an interpersonal level. Residents will increase their skills in managing depression and stress, improving nutrition, and boosting physical fitness. By working with the interdependence of emotional and physical health, residents can better understand their roles in shaping their well-being. By promoting education and instruction, social support, and having Mountain-View Assistant Living support environmental change, a positive impact can occur.

Implementation plans for the entire program:

Personnel

Qualified professionals will be required for each portion of the health promotion program. Licensed therapists such as psychologists, social workers, or counselors will be required to evaluate and help to manage the residents’ emotional states. A health care provider such as a physician, nurse, or registered dietician will be required to evaluate the nutritional progress of the residents. Physical fitness may be assessed by a physician or nurse. Instructors specializing with geriatric population who are certified to teach Yoga, Tai Chi, low impact aerobic and strength training, and water-exercises. Staff and volunteers will be required to help with the marketing and coordination of the health promotion program.

The panel will consist of elected members who will help to coordinate the direction of the health promotion program.

  • The Chair will be Madeleine Jacobs, the Director of the Mountain-View Assistant Living. Ms. Jacobs has a personal and professional investment, as well as and her Masters in Gerontology. She will ensure that the committee and health promotion program are organized and function properly.
  • The Past Chair, Michelle Corleone, M.D. will advise the present Chair on the affairs of the health promotion program.
  • The Chair-Elect will be James Emile, the CEO of the National Nursing Centers Consortium. He will learn the duties of the Chair and may serve as her replacement if she is unable to perform her duties.
  • The secretary will be Katherine Petrilla. She will be responsible for the organization of the health promotion program’s administrative and legal matters, and maintain records of the meetings. Her professional qualifications as a physical therapist will be an asset to the development of the health promotion program.
  • The treasurer will be Joseph Arendez, Attorney-At-Law, LLP. He will be responsible for financial oversight of the health promotion program. His duties will include funding, banking, and bookkeeping.
  • Stakeholders will assist with funding and coordination of the program. They are members of the community who have a vested interest in the success of Mountain-View Assistant Living.
    • Ada Greene has her Doctor of Psychology and will able to provide input on the direction of the depression portion of the health promotion program.
    • Michael Randolph is the President of Wyoming Oil, Inc. He has a Bachelor of Science in Engineering. Both of his parents currently reside at Mountain-View Assistant Living.
    • Rosa Johansson owns the local natural health food store. She has her Associates in Arts and wants to help supply Mountain-View Assistant Living with healthy foods.
    • John Fuhrman is the Director of Delphi Automotive PLC, Tyco International Ltd. He has his Master of Biomedical Science, which may be an asset when making decisions as far as the direction of health care of the residents. His mother was recently admitted into Mountain-View Assistant Living after developing the beginning signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Target population

The target population of this pilot study is senior citizens between the ages of 65 to 100 years.

Collection of primary data

The director of Mountain-View Assistant Living responded to a local advertisement for a study that offered the chance for retirement and nursing homes to improve the health of its residents and participate in a study that could benefit adults between the ages of 65 and 100. Mountain-View Assistant Living was selected for this study because the residents met the criteria of the target population and were in need of improvements in their emotional and physical health.

Facilities

A common area or gymnasium at Mountain-View Assistant Living will be required to evaluate blood pressure, weight, heart rate, grip strength, and lung capacity. Hair and saliva samples may be taken in a clinic, either on-site or off-site.  Lectures, seminars, health fares, dances and raffles may be held in a common area or gymnasium at Mountain-View Assistant Living. These areas may also be used for Yoga, Tai Chi, strength training, and aerobics. Water exercises will be conducted in the, onsite, swimming pool. Private rooms will be required for counseling and medical matters of a private nature. The nutrition program will require a cafeteria.

Locations for residents to volunteer in the community will be required. Residents may choose to volunteer in places such as an animal shelters, soup kitchens, children’s hospitals and local libraries.

Equipment and supplies

Specific equipment will be needed to measure data and assist with the various activities.

The depression-management program will require therapy dolls for residents who are unable to leave Mountain-View Assistant Living. The nutrition program will require access to healthy foods, cooking materials, and a cafeteria or kitchen. The physical fitness program will require free weights, isometric bands, floor mats, chairs, a swimming pool, and floatation devices for water exercises. Necessary medical supplies will include a sphygmomanometer for measuring blood pressure, scales for measuring weight, spirometer for measuring lung capacity, lab supplies for collecting hair and saliva samples, and hand dynamometer for measuring grip strength

Timeline (Gantt chart)

A Gantt chart will be used to assess goals and objectives of the health promotion program in accordance to time. See Figure 4.

Financial resources

The majority of financial resources will be generated from fundraising and donations. Local chapters of Silver Sneakers, AARP, and the American Geriatric Association may be able to provide assistance. Mountain-View Assistant Living can host raffles, health fares, sport events lectures, and seminars to health care professionals. By hosting these programs, the facility can help to establish a positive community presence.

The estimated budget for the health promotion program at Mountain-View assistant living will total $79,320 for the entire program. The budget will include compensation for all personnel, equipment and supplies, and any partnership with laboratory clinics. The majority of finances will come from fundraising, donations, and participations fees.

Compensation for personnel will be provided on an hourly basis. Salaries are estimated according to data at indeed.com in 2012, for the state of Colorado. It is predicted the program will require ten hours each week for therapists and health care professionals, amounting to 120 hours for three months. Staff may work their same amount of allotted hours; however will be compensated for any extra activities. Fitness instructors will work two hours per week, totaling 24 hours for three months. The total budget for personnel is $57,820.

The depression program will require licensed therapists such as a psychologists, social workers, or counselors to treat residents and assess data. Though their annual salaries vary, the range for these therapists is $39,000 to $70,000, with an average estimate of $54,000 per year. Each therapist would require $804 for three months. If four therapists were hired, the total compensation would be $3216.

The nutrition and fitness programs will require health care professionals such as physicians, nurses, or registered dieticians to assess data and treat residents. Salaries range for these health professionals from $54,000 to $94,000 equaling $74,000 per year. Each health care professional would require $1101 for three months.  If four health care professionals were hired, the total cost would be $4404.

Staff will be required to assist in activities. If the average staff member at Mountain-View Assistant Living makes $13.00 per hour, budget their compensation for twenty additional hours per week. Each staff member will require $3120.00 for three months. If ten staff members participate, the total will amount to $31,200 for three months; however this will help to ensure that the residents receive excellent care, which will ultimately benefit the entire health promotion program.

Many lecturers provide services in exchange for promotion of their business. Others may require compensation. Finances should also be set aside in case of emergencies. Lectures and seminars will require $5,000 total.

Instructors for water exercises, Yoga, Tai Chi, aerobics, and strength training will be required for the physical fitness program. Each instructor should make $40 per hour and each program should take two hours per week, amounting to $2880 for three months. If five instructors are hired, it will cost $14,000 for three months.

The panel and stakeholders have a personal that are working pro-bono.

The majority of the program will be held at Mountain View Assistant Living and outings in the community will be for the residents to volunteer. It is assumed that Mountain-View Assistant Living has a swimming pool, gymnasium, cafeteria and kitchen. For extra upkeep and an potential emergencies, the estimated budget can be $10,000 for the program.

The total budget for equipment and supplies is $11,500. Extra office supplies such as paper, pens, and printing costs will be $2,000.  Extra medical supplies include materials for analysis of hair and saliva, sphygmomanometers, scales, spirometers, and hand dynamometers and will require $3,000. The depression-management program will require therapy dolls for residents who are unable to leave the facility. The fitness program will require $1000 for free weights, isometric bands, floor mats, resistance bands, and floatation devices for water exercises. The nutrition program will require $10,000 for access to healthy foods and cooking materials. If Mountain-View Assistant Living has access to a transportation vehicle, $5,000 will be required for gas upkeep of vehicle.

Participant fees

In order to encourage participation and not prevent residents from participating, there will be no cost involved for participating residents.  Two of the stakeholders, Mr. Michael Randolph and Mr. John Fuhrman, are sponsoring all expenses associated with resident participation fees.

Marketing

Social media such as Facebook and Twitter can be used to generate excitement and promote awareness of the program. Flyers can be posted at local health food stores, physicians’ offices and clinics, fitness centers, and churches. Advertisements for activities can be placed in local newspapers as well.

Safety

Universal precautions will be required when handling all body fluids. All personnel working with residents will be required to have CPR.  Before beginning the program, residents must be evaluated by a physician or nurse to assess their general health.

Informed consent will be required for documentation that residents willingly participated in Mountain-View Assistant Living’s health promotion program. Residents will be making lifestyle changes at the advice of licensed therapists and health care professionals; these changes will impact their daily nutrition and physical activities, which could potentially exacerbate pre-existing conditions or create injury. Documentation will also be necessary to ensure HIPAA regulations and privacy policies are met.

A detailed presentation of the depression portion of the intervention

Depression impacts the lives of many people. Senior citizens are often faced with losing their health, independence, and loved ones. Limited funds and retirement are also factors which contribute to stress. And when having to reside in an assisted-living facility or nursing home, even more independence is lost.

These factors contribute to the feelings of sadness, anxiety, anger, and guilt which often occur with depression. Social withdraw, apathy, and thoughts of suicide are too often the result. Sadly, many senior citizens do not seek help, whether for financial or personal reasons and depression continues to “chip away” at their lives.

Gaining an understanding of one’s thoughts and feelings can help regain control over one’s life. By working with its residents to manage their depression, Mountain-View Assistant Living has the opportunity to make many positive changes and benefit many people.

Intervention plan

The program-planning model for the depression-management portion will be the MATCH model. The program will assess the progression of the emotional status and well-being of the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living. Both subjective and objective goals will be measured and evaluated at the end of three months. The health promotion program is a pilot study, and a large portion of the interventions will focus on the integration of instruction, counseling, social support, and environmental change. Because this program works directly with all of the residents on a personal level, each intervention will be micro and direct intervention.

Intervention implementation

The residents will be monitored and evaluated by licensed therapists such as psychologists, social workers, or counselors. Pre-existing conditions and life-factors, such as becoming recently widowed, will be considered in the treatment plan. Medication will not be distributed, but will be considered in severe cases of depression. At the beginning of the program, residents will write down at least one personal goal which they would like to achieve by the end of a three month period.

To begin the health promotion program, there will be an introductory orientation providing information about managing depression, improving nutrition, and physical fitness. At the end of the orientation, residents will take a brief quiz to provide better understanding of their current emotional state.

The licensed therapists will provide individual assessments and will help them decide whether they would prefer therapy in a group or individual setting.  In these sessions, residents will identify stress-factors and ways to resolve them. They will be encouraged to keep a journal regarding their thoughts and feelings. By the end of the first week of the depression program, the residents will have created at least one affirmation to repeat daily throughout three months. Affirmations may change with the progression of the program. Questionnaires chosen by the licensed therapist(s) will be administered to assess each resident monthly. These questionnaires will help both residents and therapists gain a better understanding of the residents’ monthly progress. Residents will be evaluated by the therapists according to the DSM-IV-TR. Results are anticipated to improve by 25% in three months.

Activities and intervention methods

  • Residents will take a brief quiz analyzing their self-esteem and perception of stress after initial orientation to gauge emotional state. This activity will contribute to instructional intervention and counseling.
  • Individual or group therapy will be offered to residents weekly by the licensed therapist to help them manage their depression, offering both social support and counseling.
  • Stress-factors will be identified and conflict resolution for stressful situations will be taught as instructional intervention.
  • Journaling and affirmations will promote emotional health and create a better understanding of thoughts and feelings; this is an example of instructional intervention.
  • Residents will have the opportunity to volunteer with various activities such as animal shelters, soup kitchens, and children’s hospitals. Having a positive impact on the lives of others will help to create social support and environmental change outside of Mountain-View Assistant Living. Residents will be able to see that they are a vital part of the community and have much to contribute.
  • Therapy dolls will be used to promote cognition, self-esteem, and social interaction in a nurturing environment for residents who are unable to leave the facility and for those with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.
  • Activities which promote cognitive awareness such as cards, checkers, BINGO, and movie night will be offered to residents. Social support and relationships among the residents will be fostered and contribute to a positive environmental change.
  • Subjective questionnaires assessing stress-management and overall happiness chosen by therapists will be assessed monthly to monitor residents’ progress. These questionnaires are examples of counseling intervention and contribute to environmental change.
  • Residents will be evaluated by the therapists according to the DSM-IV-TR. These results will be part of counseling and contribute to environmental change.
  • Fundraising activities can function as opportunities to implement social support and environmental change. Activities may include raffles, health fares, dances, and other social events that promote social interaction.
  • At the end of the program, a dance will be held to celebrate. The person showing the most improvement in their scores will be awarded with a trophy and a $100 gift card to the restaurant or store of their choosing.

Intervention evaluation

The results of the depression portion of the program will be monitored with both subjective and objective results at the end of a three month period. Goals will be assessed and success will be determined if residents were able to achieve them or how close they are to achieving them. By the end of three months, residents will have better conflict-resolution skills and develop a more positive attitude when handling stress. Licensed therapists will evaluate residents based on monthly subjective questionnaires and DSM-IV-TR standards. Results are anticipated to improve 25%.

Evaluation plan for the health promotion program

Process evaluation

Personnel

Specific personnel will be required to facilitate the functioning of all three health promotion programs. Personnel involved in the depression management portion of the program will be licensed therapists such as psychologists, social workers, or counselors. The nutrition and fitness programs will require health care providers such as a physician or nurse; a registered dietician would be beneficial. Other participants will be staff from Mountain-View Assistant Living, volunteers, and residents. Certified instructors in Tai Chi, Yoga, water exercises, and strength-training and aerobics and residents will be required. An elected panel will be responsible for the coordination and facilitation of the health care promotion program. Stakeholders will assist will funding and direction.

Socioeconomic population

The residents are predominantly of the geriatric population. Race, sex, and socioeconomic background are not being evaluated at this time.

Time frame

The time frame of this pilot study is a period of three months.

Target Population

The target population for the study will be adults between the ages of 65 to 100.

years.

Collection of primary data

The director of Mountain-View Assistant Living responded to a local advertisement for a study that offered the chance for retirement and nursing homes to improve the health of its residents and participate in a study that could benefit adults between the ages of 65 and 100. Mountain-View Assistant Living was selected for this study because the residents met the criteria of the target population and were in need of improvements in their emotional and physical health.

Panel                                           

The panel will consist of elected members who will help to coordinate the direction of the health promotion program.

  • The Chair, Ms. Gretchen Magnusson, the Director of the Mountain-View Assistant Living. Ms. Magnusson has a personal and professional investment, as well as and her Masters in Gerontology. She will ensure that the committee and health promotion program are organized and function properly.
  • The Past Chair, Michelle Corleone, M.D. will advise the present Chair on the affairs of the health promotion program.
  • The Chair-Elect will be James Emile, the CEO of the National Nursing Centers Consortium. He will learn the duties of the Chair and may serve as her replacement if she is unable to perform her duties.
  • The secretary will be Katherine Petrilla. She will be responsible for the organization of the health promotion program’s administrative and legal matters, and maintain records of the meetings. Her professional qualifications as a physical therapist will be an asset to the development of the health promotion program.
  • The treasurer will be Joseph Arendez, Attorney-At-Law, LLP. He will be responsible for financial oversight of the health promotion program. His duties will include funding, banking, and bookkeeping.
  • Stakeholders will assist with funding and coordination of the program. They are members of the community who have a vested interest in the success of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

Dr. Ada Greene has her Doctor of Psychology and will able to provide input on the direction of the depression portion of the health promotion program.

Michael Randolph is the President of Wyoming Oil, Inc. He has a Bachelor of Science in Engineering. Both of his parents currently reside at Mountain-View Assistant Living.

Rosa Johansson owns the local natural health food store. She has her Associates in Arts and wants to help supply Mountain-View Assistant Living with healthy foods.

John Fuhrman is the Director of Delphi Automotive PLC, Tyco International Ltd.  He has his Master of Biomedical Science, which may be an asset when making decisions as far as the direction of health care of the residents. His mother was recently admitted into Mountain-View Assistant Living after developing the beginning signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Intervention plan

All three programs of this pilot study consist of a micro intervention and a direct intervention, as each works directly with individual residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living on a personal level. Other interventions such as instruction and education, counseling, social support, and environmental change will be incorporated in relation to each activity and objective.

Activities will implement intervention methods and models. The activities will focus on improving the emotional and physical health of the residents of Mountain-View Assistant Living.

Potential barriers to the success of the health promotion program

Pre-existing conditions of residents may hinder the progress of their goal achievement. Due to up-coming holidays, communication will have to be maintained in order to ensure that the program is continued without interference.

  • Program evaluation is not the same as regular pro-gram monitoring. Program monitoring refers simply to keeping records on thenature of the participants, the services they receive, and their progress towardattaining program objectives. The purpose of monitoring is to provide sys-tematically connected information on what was done, for whom, and where.These types of data are also called tracking measures

Program evaluation typicallyincludes monitoring plus methods for determining more specifically and withmore certainty that the program intervention and activities themselves pro-duced the outcomes that are observed. In short, program evaluation addressesthe question of what was done and whether the program itself was effectiveand why.

Program evaluation is not the same as regular pro-gram monitoring. Program monitoring refers simply to keeping records on thenature of the participants, the services they receive, and their progress towardattaining program objectives. The purpose of monitoring is to provide sys-tematically connected information on what was done, for whom, and where.These types of data are also called

tracking measures

Program evaluation typicallyincludes monitoring plus methods for determining more specifically and withmore certainty that the program intervention and activities themselves pro-duced the outcomes that are observed. In short, program evaluation addressesthe question of what was done and whether the program itself was effectiveand why.

Impact Evaluation

The immediate goals of this pilot study will be evaluated at the end of three months. Each resident will have personal and objective goals to be achieved and a 25% improvement is expected to result. Unintended effects of the program may be that residents exacerbate a pre-existing condition or injury. Positive effects may be residents achieve better results than anticipated and progress beyond anticipated outcomes. However, if no action is taken, then residents will continue as before. This health promotion program is worth the costs to see what improvements can be made. If this pilot study is successful, it may be used in future studies to help improve the health and wellness of senior citizens on a more global level.

Participation may be limited among some residents due to pre-existing conditions. There will be no control group because the desired outcome is to improve health and wellness of individual people.

The immediate effect of the depression-management program is to help residents manage their depression or identify their risk. At the initial orientation, residents will take a brief quiz on their current emotional state. The ultimate desired outcome is for residents to feel happier and to better manage negative emotions. Subjective questionnaires and DSM-IV-TR evaluation statistics will show 25% improvement after three months.

The immediate effect the nutrition program is to create excitement and educate residents on eating healthy meals. At the end of the initial orientation, residents will be able to pass a small quiz on nutrition information based on USDA guidelines. After three months, residents will take another quiz and results can be compared. The ultimate desired outcome is for residents to achieve a better level of health and wellness and to improve results of blood pressure, hair and saliva samples, and weight in three months.

The immediate effect of the fitness program is to create excitement and to encourage residents to be more active. At the end of orientation, residents will be able to find their radial pulse and take their heart rate. The ultimate desired outcome is to get residents on a better level of health and wellness and to feel better and improve results of blood pressure, heart rate, lung capacity, grip strength, samples of hair and saliva, and weight by 25% in three months.

Outcome evaluation

Anticipated changes of the depression-management program will be an improved emotional state. Residents will be encouraged to engage in activities they enjoy and participate in more social settings. Stress-management and conflict-resolution skills will also be improved. Residents will be encouraged to write down a personal goal they wish to achieve in three months. After the orientation, residents will take a brief quiz to better assess their current emotional state. Affirmations will be created by the residents within a week to repeat to themselves on a daily basis. Individual or group therapy sessions will teach residents how to better manage stress and feelings of sadness. Residents will be encouraged to keep a journal to record their thoughts and feelings. Licensed therapists will assess residents according to subjective questionnaires and DSM-IV-TR standards. Results will be expected to improve by 25% in three months.

Anticipated changes of the nutrition program will be improved energy, results of objective health measurements, increased longevity, and increase in awareness and knowledge about personal health. Results of objective measurements include blood pressure, weight, and hair and saliva samples. At the end of orientation, residents will take a brief quiz on their knowledge of USDA dietary information. These results can be compared to a final quiz given at the end of three months. By the end of three months, residents will be able to plan and prepare healthy meals based on their dietary program. Residents’ objective health measurements are anticipated to improve 25% in three months.

Anticipated changes of the fitness program will be improved energy, results of objective measurements, increased longevity, and increase in awareness and knowledge about personal health. Results of objective measurements include blood pressure, weight, hair and saliva samples, heart rate, lung capacity, grip strength. After orientation, residents will know how to take their heart rate for 60 seconds. After three months, residents will be able to perform their exercise plan at least three times per week with confidence.  Residents’ objective results will improve 25% in three months.

Personnel responsible for conducting the evaluation

Personnel involved in the depression management portion of the program will be licensed therapists such as psychologists, social workers, or counselors. Health care professionals such as a physician or nurse will be required for the nutrition and fitness programs. A registered dietician can be beneficial to the nutrition program. Other participants will be staff from Mountain-View Assistant Living, volunteers, and residents. Certified instructors in Tai Chi, Yoga, water exercises and strength-training and aerobics and residents will be required. Elected members of the panel and stakeholders will be responsible for the health promotion program’s coordination, facilitation, and funding.

How the evaluation will be conducted

The health promotion program will be evaluated by both subjective and objective data.

Both subjective and objective findings are anticipated to improve by 25% in a period of three months. If the outcome is successful, the program will be continued.

Residents will select one personal goal they wish to achieve from the program within three months. The goals can be anything residents wish to achieve, from playing with grandchildren, improving energy, or walking one mile.

At the introductory orientation of the program, two quizzes will be administered: one will assess on the residents’ current emotional state and the other will test their nutritional knowledge based on USDA standards. Another quiz on nutrition will be given after three months to evaluate how much the residents have learned. Residents will also be able to find their radial pulse and take their heart rate for 60 seconds after the initial orientation.

Within one week of the program, residents will think of at least one positive affirmation they can repeat daily. Individual or group therapy sessions will help residents identify and manage stress-factors and negative situations. Residents will be able to plan and prepare simple meals by the end of the program. Residents will also be able to independent perform their prescribed exercises at least three times per week.

Subjective questionnaires selected by licensed therapists and health care professionals will be administered once a month. Residents will be evaluated according to DSM-IV-TR and results will be anticipated to improve 25% in three months. Hair and saliva samples will be taken every other week. Blood pressure, weight, lung capacity, heart rate, and grip strength will be assessed weekly. Hair and saliva samples and readings of blood pressure and weight can be shared with the information from the nutrition program.

Conclusion

Mountain-View Assistant Living has the opportunity to help its residents improve their emotional and physical health. The overall health and wellness of the residents is anticipated to significantly improve within three months. By actively helping residents improve their physical and emotional health, Mountain-View Assistant Living will cement its reputation as a facility that cares. Regardless final outcomes statistics, residents, the community, and Mountain-View Assistant Living will all be benefited from the education on promoting better health and wellness.

References

Alert, P. D., Villarroel, R. M., Formiga, F., Casas, N. V., &Farre, C.V. (2012). Assessing risk screening methods of malnutrition in geriatric patients: Mini nutritional assessment (mna) versus geriatric nutritional risk index (gnri). NutriciónHospitalaria, 27(2), 590-8. Retrieved from http://scielo.isciii.es/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0212-16112012000200036&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en

Andrews, P.W., & Thompson, J. A. (2010). The bright side of being blue: Depression as an adaptation for analyzing complex problems. Psychological Review, 116(3), 620-654. doi: 10.1037/a0016242. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2734449/

Chan, D., Tsou, H., Yang, R., Tsauo, J., Chen, C., Hsiung, C., &Kuo, K. (2012). A pilot randomized controlled trial to improve geriatric frailty. BioMed Central Geriatrics, 12(58), doi: 0.1186/1471-2318-12-58. Retrieved from http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2318-12-58.pdf

Ekwall, A., Lindburg, A., & Magnusson, M.(2009). Dizzy – why not take a walk? Low Level Physical Activity Improves Quality of Life among Elderly with Dizziness. Gerontology, 55(6), 652-659. doi: 10.1159/000235812 Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19707007

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics,(2012). Older Americans 2012: Key indicators of well-being. Retrieved from National Center for Health Statistics website: http://www.agingstats.gov/agingstatsdotnet/Main_Site/Data/2012_Documents/Docs/EntireChartbook.pdf

Fertman , C. I., & Allensworth, D. D. (2010). Health promotion programs: From theory to practice. (1st ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Retrieved from http://www.scribd.com/doc/56687950/Health-Promotion-Program

Group yoga helps stroke victims improve function, balance. (2012, July 27). Retrieved from http://seniorjournal.com/NEWS/Fitness/2012/20120727-Group_Yoga.htm

Middleson, C., & Smith, S. (2011). Purchasing habits of senior farmers. Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics, 30(3), 248-260. doi: 10.1080/21551197.2011.591269. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=).%20Purchasing%20habits%20of%20senior%20farmers.%20Journal%20of%20Nutrition%20in%20Gerontology%20and%20Geriatrics%2C

Reiser, L. M., & Schlenk, E. A. (2009). Clinical use of physical activity measures. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 21(2), 87-94. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-7599.2008.00389.x. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1745-7599.2008.00389.x/abstract;jsessionid=BC93CB23F77F90F16A3929EE123360AF.d02t01

Tai chi enlarges brains, improves memory, thinking, in elderly Chinese. (2012, July 19). Retrieved from http://seniorjournal.com/NEWS/Fitness/2012/20120619-Tai_Chi_Enlarges.htm

Tai chi reduces falls in older people: New study confirms earlier reports. (2005, July 27). Retrieved from http://seniorjournal.com/NEWS/Fitness/2005/5-06-27TaiChi-Falls.htm

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Introduction Colonization perpetrated the oppression of indigenous communities. Also, the struggle against cultural imperialism lay at the heart of oppression as the culture of native [...]

Pages: 7

Words: 2029

Research Paper

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