The Power of a Positive Frame, Essay Example

DEFINING A FRAME
If you consider a picture frame, the frame provides the border to the picture and as such establishes the perimeters or boundaries in which the picture is contained. This is equally appropriate for scientific papers in terms of establishing the scope of work. The work will be contained within these boundaries or perimeters. Going outside of this frame is considered as being outside the scope of the work or research being conducted. In this context frames may be considered as either ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. A positive framework is one which is fully inclusive in terms of addressing all of the required needs. A negative framework may be one which is purely defensive and is limited only to addressing specific points. These are often used in military strategy in order to define limited terms of engagement.
POSITIVE FRAMEWORKS| Appreciative Inquiry – Is an example of a positive framework. It is the affirming nature of this approach that defines ‘positivism’, as opposed to the dissection of problems it builds upon the root causes of success and as such is a powerful change agent. It operates within a non-threatening environment and assimilates the knowledge of subject matter experts. When adopting the technique of appreciative inquiry, in problem solving situations , it is important to focus energies on the positive attributes as this helps in the consolidation of strengths. (Hammond, S.A. 1996).
| Positive Psychology – Psycology of Religion is a good example of where a positive framework can be built in order to deal with the analtical aspects of this subject matter. The theoretical framework of psychology is used in order to examine religious sentiments and behaviours. The theoretical framework of psychology is able to provide the positive boundaries for such studies and frame how questions of research and intervention will be dealt with in retaining context of the core subject matter. As such psychology is seen as a positive virttue in terms of learning about religion. (Selvam, S.G. 2012).
| Quantum Learning – The concept of quantum learning provides a framework for student learning based upon a number of key components that include integrity, commitment, ownership, flexibility and balance. It is based upon the premise that all people learn differently but that a degree of excellence can be built into these different approaches. The framework for student learning is a positive one as it sets the boundaries for five main tenants of learning. As such all that we accomplish has to have a purpose . It acknowledges the effort of learning and celebrates the successful outcome of that venture. (Pritscher, C.P. 2001)
| Protective Approach – Protective frameworks are widely used in both healthcare and social work contexts. One example being that of a Child Welfare protective framework within the context of social care. This provides a legal framework for the protection of child care. The positivism is associated with the protection of the rights of the child whilst in welfare or social care settings. This prevents cases of child abuse or mistreatment of the child with appropriate legal remedies and intervention measures. The approach was intended to address more direct focus on the rights and welfare of the child, as opposed to that of the family where the attention was previously focused. The frame was therefore narrowed to set the boundaries around that of child welfare and protection. (Tomison & Stanley, 2001)
THE POWER OF POSITIVE FRAMEWORKS
The science technology society (STSE) is a movement that has helped to advance the concept of positive frameworks in science education. This looking at how science education can integrate science and technology into a framework that embraces aspects of economics, social and cultural contexts. Through these efforts an Australian scientist ( Peter Fensham) has been instrimental in getting science back onto the schools curriculum.
Positive frameworks have also gained prominence in the scientific field of psychology, in particular recent research conducted by Peterson and Seligman on the psychology of character strength. They devcloped a framwork appropriate to the diagnostics and statistics of mental disorders. (Biswas-Diener, R. 2007)
The concept of green engineering within the environmental sciences is an example of where a `cradle to grave`framework has been developed in order to help define the parameters of the natural systems that inform human design. It is based upon the free energy that is provided by the sun and how this interacts with the earths system to create a biologically diverse environment. This deemed to be extremely efficient resulting in very little waste products. These natural systems may be embodied into a scientific framework that will help humans becme more environmentally conscious of managing their surroundings. This framework designs a framework that helps to eliminate conflict between that of economic growth and issues resulting from poor design in environmental health, thereby facilitating a strategic concept that can embrace more holistic measures to reach a wider purpose. (Braungart, M. 2012)
| Hope – We understand that hope brings us a greater recognition of the green engineering principles in managing a sustainable environment. The objective of managing those scarce resources at our disposal for the benefit of mankind and eliminating harmful wastes into our environment. By understanding the natural forces of nature it is hoped that a positive learning experience can result resulting in a more responsible approach to green engineering. .
| Energy – We understand that energy brings us the collrective power and dynamics of people power that is harnessed towards a specific objective i.e. the development of an improved sustainability framework for better management of the environment
| Building Community – We understand that building community helps to bring about a more integrated social fabric. In this case the understanding of environmental issues and the need for programs of long term sustainability without creating wastes that are potentially harmful to the environment. .
| Aspirational – We understand that aspiration brings us a more positive environmental and inclusive approach towards tackling sustainability in green engineering and design for improved environmental conditions. .
POSITIVE FRAMES IN PREVENTION


Fig 1 provides an example of a Positive framework that is split into the following cyclical steps: (1) Diagnosis (2) Prioritization (3) Implementation and (4) Evaluation . Within the context of the Alberta study this might embrace the following approach:
 A positive framework is not merely stating what the correect assumptions are or what you believe to be right but the need to include the concern of what is right. For example, a legal framework may bound the legalities of what you believe to be right but the concern might be applying these in the correct way so that they are interpreted and implemented in the correct manner;
 A framework may be one of a protective nature, as in the green engineering example where the frame is to protect the environment from human intervention that creates waste bi-products that are harmful to the environment. Equally it may address risk or harm. Doctors have an ethical framework based upon the doctrine “ first do no harm”, this supercedes other ethical considerations or briefly interpreted provides the framework for doctors to provide medical assistance without damaging or harming individuals by a deliberate act. The Royal Wolverhampton Hospital provides an example framework as this doctrine applies to the medical profession

(Fig 2 refers). (Royal Wolverhampton Hospital, 2012)

CONCLUSIONS
The paper deomstrates how the use of positive frameworks can be a powerful means of defining scope and focusing on specific areas of subject matter, particularly in the important field of science education. The diagram in Figure 2 illustrates how you can build an holistic framework over a wide degree of inter-related subject matter in order to provide this with both structure and a sense of meaning or purpose. This has wide application in varying aspects of scientific research. For prevention leaders this helps to establish the boundaries between different parameters e.g. Safety vs Risk .

References

Braungart, W. M. (2012, 2 12). Crade to cradle design and principles of green design. Retrieved from Environmental Science and Technology: http://www.mcdonough.com/writings/c2c_design.htm
Hammond, S. A. (1996). Appreciative Inquiry. New York: The Thin Book Press.
Pritscher, C. P. (2001). Quantum learning beyond duality. New York / Amsterdam: Rodobi BV.
Robert Biswas-Diener, B. D. (2007). Positive Psychology Coaching: Putting the Science of Happiness to Work. New York: John Wiley.
Royal Wolverhampton Hospital. (2012, 2 10). Do no Harm Framework. Retrieved from Royal Wolverhampton Hospital: http://www.royalwolverhamptonhospitals.nhs.uk/patients__public/preventing_harm_campaign/preventing_harm_-_framework.aspx
Selvam, S. G. (2012, 2 10). Positive Psychology as a theoretical framework for psychology of religion. Retrieved from Psychology of Religion: http://www.sahayaselvam.org/2011/11/25/positive-psychology-as-a-theoretical-framework-for-psychology-of-religion/
Tomison, A. M., & Stanley, J. (2001). Strategic Directions in Child Protection: Informing Policy and Practice. Melbourne: South Australian Dept of Human Services.

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The power of a positive frame
Student Name
Professor Name
Other
10 February 2012

DEFINING A FRAME
If you consider a picture frame, the frame provides the border to the picture and as such establishes the perimeters or boundaries in which the picture is contained. This is equally appropriate for scientific papers in terms of establishing the scope of work. The work will be contained within these boundaries or perimeters. Going outside of this frame is considered as being outside the scope of the work or research being conducted. In this context frames may be considered as either ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. A positive framework is one which is fully inclusive in terms of addressing all of the required needs. A negative framework may be one which is purely defensive and is limited only to addressing specific points. These are often used in military strategy in order to define limited terms of engagement.
POSITIVE FRAMEWORKS
| Appreciative Inquiry – Is an example of a positive framework. It is the affirming nature of this approach that defines ‘positivism’, as opposed to the dissection of problems it builds upon the root causes of success and as such is a powerful change agent. It operates within a non-threatening environment and assimilates the knowledge of subject matter experts. When adopting the technique of appreciative inquiry, in problem solving situations , it is important to focus energies on the positive attributes as this helps in the consolidation of strengths. (Hammond, S.A. 1996).
| Positive Psychology – Psycology of Religion is a good example of where a positive framework can be built in order to deal with the analtical aspects of this subject matter. The theoretical framework of psychology is used in order to examine religious sentiments and behaviours. The theoretical framework of psychology is able to provide the positive boundaries for such studies and frame how questions of research and intervention will be dealt with in retaining context of the core subject matter. As such psychology is seen as a positive virttue in terms of learning about religion. (Selvam, S.G. 2012).
| Quantum Learning – The concept of quantum learning provides a framework for student learning based upon a number of key components that include integrity, commitment, ownership, flexibility and balance. It is based upon the premise that all people learn differently but that a degree of excellence can be built into these different approaches. The framework for student learning is a positive one as it sets the boundaries for five main tenants of learning. As such all that we accomplish has to have a purpose . It acknowledges the effort of learning and celebrates the successful outcome of that venture. (Pritscher, C.P. 2001)
| Protective Approach – Protective frameworks are widely used in both healthcare and social work contexts. One example being that of a Child Welfare protective framework within the context of social care. This provides a legal framework for the protection of child care. The positivism is associated with the protection of the rights of the child whilst in welfare or social care settings. This prevents cases of child abuse or mistreatment of the child with appropriate legal remedies and intervention measures. The approach was intended to address more direct focus on the rights and welfare of the child, as opposed to that of the family where the attention was previously focused. The frame was therefore narrowed to set the boundaries around that of child welfare and protection. (Tomison & Stanley, 2001)
THE POWER OF POSITIVE FRAMEWORKS
The science technology society (STSE) is a movement that has helped to advance the concept of positive frameworks in science education. This looking at how science education can integrate science and technology into a framework that embraces aspects of economics, social and cultural contexts. Through these efforts an Australian scientist ( Peter Fensham) has been instrimental in getting science back onto the schools curriculum.
Positive frameworks have also gained prominence in the scientific field of psychology, in particular recent research conducted by Peterson and Seligman on the psychology of character strength. They devcloped a framwork appropriate to the diagnostics and statistics of mental disorders. (Biswas-Diener, R. 2007)
The concept of green engineering within the environmental sciences is an example of where a `cradle to grave`framework has been developed in order to help define the parameters of the natural systems that inform human design. It is based upon the free energy that is provided by the sun and how this interacts with the earths system to create a biologically diverse environment. This deemed to be extremely efficient resulting in very little waste products. These natural systems may be embodied into a scientific framework that will help humans becme more environmentally conscious of managing their surroundings. This framework designs a framework that helps to eliminate conflict between that of economic growth and issues resulting from poor design in environmental health, thereby facilitating a strategic concept that can embrace more holistic measures to reach a wider purpose. (Braungart, M. 2012)
| Hope – We understand that hope brings us a greater recognition of the green engineering principles in managing a sustainable environment. The objective of managing those scarce resources at our disposal for the benefit of mankind and eliminating harmful wastes into our environment. By understanding the natural forces of nature it is hoped that a positive learning experience can result resulting in a more responsible approach to green engineering. .
| Energy – We understand that energy brings us the collrective power and dynamics of people power that is harnessed towards a specific objective i.e. the development of an improved sustainability framework for better management of the environment
| Building Community – We understand that building community helps to bring about a more integrated social fabric. In this case the understanding of environmental issues and the need for programs of long term sustainability without creating wastes that are potentially harmful to the environment. .
| Aspirational – We understand that aspiration brings us a more positive environmental and inclusive approach towards tackling sustainability in green engineering and design for improved environmental conditions. .
POSITIVE FRAMES IN PREVENTION
Fig 1 provides an example of a Positive framework that is split into the following cyclical steps: (1) Diagnosis (2) Prioritization (3) Implementation and (4) Evaluation . Within the context of the Alberta study this might embrace the following approach:
 A positive framework is not merely stating what the correect assumptions are or what you believe to be right but the need to include the concern of what is right. For example, a legal framework may bound the legalities of what you believe to be right but the concern might be applying these in the correct way so that they are interpreted and implemented in the correct manner;
 A framework may be one of a protective nature, as in the green engineering example where the frame is to protect the environment from human intervention that creates waste bi-products that are harmful to the environment. Equally it may address risk or harm. Doctors have an ethical framework based upon the doctrine “ first do no harm”, this supercedes other ethical considerations or briefly interpreted provides the framework for doctors to provide medical assistance without damaging or harming individuals by a deliberate act. The Royal Wolverhampton Hospital provides an example framework as this doctrine applies to the medical profession (Fig 2 refers). (Royal Wolverhampton Hospital, 2012)
CONCLUSIONS
The paper deomstrates how the use of positive frameworks can be a powerful means of defining scope and focusing on specific areas of subject matter, particularly in the important field of science education. The diagram in Figure 2 illustrates how you can build an holistic framework over a wide degree of inter-related subject matter in order to provide this with both structure and a sense of meaning or purpose. This has wide application in varying aspects of scientific research. For prevention leaders this helps to establish the boundaries between different parameters e.g. Safety vs Risk .

References

Braungart, W. M. (2012, 2 12). Crade to cradle design and principles of green design. Retrieved from Environmental Science and Technology: http://www.mcdonough.com/writings/c2c_design.htm
Hammond, S. A. (1996). Appreciative Inquiry. New York: The Thin Book Press.
Pritscher, C. P. (2001). Quantum learning beyond duality. New York / Amsterdam: Rodobi BV.
Robert Biswas-Diener, B. D. (2007). Positive Psychology Coaching: Putting the Science of Happiness to Work. New York: John Wiley.
Royal Wolverhampton Hospital. (2012, 2 10). Do no Harm Framework. Retrieved from Royal Wolverhampton Hospital: http://www.royalwolverhamptonhospitals.nhs.uk/patients__public/preventing_harm_campaign/preventing_harm_-_framework.aspx
Selvam, S. G. (2012, 2 10). Positive Psychology as a theoretical framework for psychology of religion. Retrieved from Psychology of Religion: http://www.sahayaselvam.org/2011/11/25/positive-psychology-as-a-theoretical-framework-for-psychology-of-religion/
Tomison, A. M., & Stanley, J. (2001). Strategic Directions in Child Protection: Informing Policy and Practice. Melbourne: South Australian Dept of Human Services.

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