Get a Free E-Book! ($50 Value)
HIRE A WRITER!
Paper Types
Disciplines
Get a Free E-Book! ($50 Value)

They Made Us Many Promises, Essay Example

Pages: 1

Words: 1257

Essay

Compare and contrast the treatment of Indians in Canada and Massachusetts by the French and English? What did each want from the Indians? What role did religion play? What were the similarities and differences in their impact on Indian societies?

The expansion of North America faced a sudden wave of immigration influx. It lured people from all the corners of the world because of the untapped rich resources, vast market, riches, adventure, beauty, natural charisma and freedom. It was a virgin country and much of the land was not solicited. Moreover there was less competition, less bureaucracy, less governmental intervention or less political or religious dogmas.

Two most influential and rich powers of the world, Britain and France were the first immigrants. They came with the expectation to rule and create trade stations in the country and thought that they would meet with a genre of inferior and unskilled tribes of people. Much to their dismay, they met groups of skillful and organized group of people rather than savages.

French and British both had explored the country for reaping financial gains and bliss for their homeland. However, their relations and ideologies were different in terms of their treatment to the Indians. French were more observant, calm and professional. They intermingled with the native culture, traits and believed that good and benevolent relationship with the inhabitants could help in the process of their work. So they followed a policy of compassion and treated the natives as counterparts and equals. They never really apprehended to rule or subjugate by colonization. Their relationship and benefits were humble and good, and they even had marriages between themselves. Thus they believed in co-existence and sharing as opposed to the British. Like all other countries of the world, where Britain had its shadow of colonization.  Natives were oppressed, exploited and treated as slaves. They were forced to work in lower wages and the British usually hated and resented them. They maintained a distance and treated them with contempt. This made them vehement enemies of the Indians. The French and the Indians both wanted to push the British eastward. The French missionaries also had an impact on the Indians in Canada and Massachusetts. They spoke and educated the Indians about Catholicism and in a subtle and convincing way transformed the natives into their own religion. The effect was a organized, and cultured way of life. There were schools, local governments, business and a prosperous condition for living.  The British fought with the local people, had disputes and competed in the farming trade with each other.

Describe the French and English rivalry and its impact on Indians in a) The North b) Pennsylvania and c) The South. How did Indians decide who to support? After the defeat of the French, what were Indian relations with the English like?

Both French and British wanted to proliferate and expand their trade horizons, and lead to clash among themselves. There was rivalry with regards to trade interests like the fur trade and both wanted to capture the best land. The hostility increased to the point of war, and came to be known as French and Indian war (1754-1763).

There was a friendly vibe among the native Indians for the French, due to the constant oppression of the British. They thus swayed easily in French support.. Britain was poignant about this disadvantage and started taking measures to develop relations with the natives. They lured them with money and prospects and took the confidence of a fraction of Indians.

The situation of the Indian tribes in Pennsylvania however went worse. The successors of William Penn (the leader who had high regards for the native people) made large encroachments on the land of the Indians and made their lives miserable. Thus in the battle between the French and the British in the Ohio Valley, they took the side of French.

The setback of France in the battle of the Ohio Valley was a disaster for the Indians. The native people had given their whole hearted support and formed the third party in the major war. The British victories lead them to be treated as enemies of the British Empire, while only the Iroquois Confederacy was spared because of their alleged alliance with the British. The Iroquois and British alliance crumbled and soon they continued to wage a bitter struggle against the British. The struggle continued for more than 50 years and the outcome was inconclusive as they could in no way match the military potential of the British.

How did Spain attempt to control its Southwest territories? How complete was that control? Which Indian nations were allies of the Spanish? Enemies? What was the Spanish impact on Indian culture and society? How did they compare to the English and French?

During the 18th Century, North America was occupied by Spain, Britain and France. Spain had its share of Florida but after the war British claimed the land which stretched from the east coast of North America to the Mississippi River. Spain could not face the British warfare and naval strength and the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1763. The Spanish influence was detrimental and a disaster for the native Indians. On the one hand they taught the native people to be trained in Christianity, educating them about their rights and privileges while on the other hand they exploited and oppressed them to a great extent. They enslaved them, tortured them and carried all their wealth to their homeland. They were equal and vehement partners in crime, with the British in their abuse and exploitation of the natives.

How did the US. justify taking Indian lands after 1783? Were these justifications valid? What goals did Indian assimilation serve for the US.? Why did assimilation cause Indians such turmoil? Why did pressure for Indian lands increase in the 1820s? How did Andrew Jackson respond?

The United States negotiated, signed agreements with the Indian nations during the American Revolution. Millions of acres of land were confiscated by the federal government for settlement and for agriculture. Finally they justified by saying that their lands would “be held in trust for them and for their progeny in perpetuity.” United States tried an assimilation effort that corresponded to Americanization of Native Indians. George Washington and Henry Knox was the first to promulgate such cultural transformation where they were given education and encourage cultural values. They were asked to learn the values and sentiments of United States, they were forced to abandon their language and speak English, attend church and forego the tribal traditions.

When US captured the fertile lands, they experienced a great boom when they introduced new crops like cotton and the country experienced significant urban growth. So the pressure on lands increased. So there was the controversial Indian Removal Act in 1830 which was introduced in the U.S. Congress. This Act authorized the President to remove the native Indians from their homeland, to other parts of the country like in the present day Kansas and Oklahoma.  It was a point of debate and rigorous criticism among the people. However with the support of the 7th President of United States, President Andrew Jackson, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act. In December 1830, Jackson told Congress: “The consequences of a speedy removal will be important to the United States, to individual States, and to the Indians themselves. . . It will relieve the whole State of Mississippi and the western part of Alabama of Indian occupancy, and enable those States to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”

Works Cited

Phillip Weeks. 2002. They Made Us Many Promises. October 26, 2009.

Time is precious

Time is precious

don’t waste it!

Get instant essay
writing help!
Get instant essay writing help!
Plagiarism-free guarantee

Plagiarism-free
guarantee

Privacy guarantee

Privacy
guarantee

Secure checkout

Secure
checkout

Money back guarantee

Money back
guarantee

Related Essay Samples & Examples

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Essay Example

Compare and contrast 2 stages of Piaget. The sensory motor stage is the first recognizable of four stages in cognitive development of a person. It [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 625

Essay

Test of Dna Finds Root of Illness, Essay Example

The article selected is entitled, ‘In a First, Test of DNA Finds Root of Illness. It was written by Carl Zimmer. One specific thing I [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 628

Essay

Introspection and Reflection, Essay Example

Abstract Introspection and reflection are important components of counseling and educational practices.  The points which will be reviewed for introspection are the reflections with regards [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 1261

Essay

Nursing: Interoperability, Essay Example

Evaluate the challenges that health care organizations may face when sharing data across systems. Flow of data across systems is often inhibited due to lack [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 482

Essay

Understanding the Concept of Paternalism, Essay Example

The determination of the need to follow instructions has often led people into a determinable course of simply defining their ways according to what they [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 1923

Essay

Ikea’s Household Appeal, Essay Example

Ikea is one of the most innovative fast growing companies throughout the world. Their brand of household furniture and accessories. Ikea utilizes a wide range [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 1773

Essay

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Essay Example

Compare and contrast 2 stages of Piaget. The sensory motor stage is the first recognizable of four stages in cognitive development of a person. It [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 625

Essay

Test of Dna Finds Root of Illness, Essay Example

The article selected is entitled, ‘In a First, Test of DNA Finds Root of Illness. It was written by Carl Zimmer. One specific thing I [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 628

Essay

Introspection and Reflection, Essay Example

Abstract Introspection and reflection are important components of counseling and educational practices.  The points which will be reviewed for introspection are the reflections with regards [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 1261

Essay

Nursing: Interoperability, Essay Example

Evaluate the challenges that health care organizations may face when sharing data across systems. Flow of data across systems is often inhibited due to lack [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 482

Essay

Understanding the Concept of Paternalism, Essay Example

The determination of the need to follow instructions has often led people into a determinable course of simply defining their ways according to what they [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 1923

Essay

Ikea’s Household Appeal, Essay Example

Ikea is one of the most innovative fast growing companies throughout the world. Their brand of household furniture and accessories. Ikea utilizes a wide range [...]

Pages: 1

Words: 1773

Essay

Get a Free E-Book ($50 in value)

Get a Free E-Book

How To Write The Best Essay Ever!

How To Write The Best Essay Ever!