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Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Essay Example

Pages: 5

Words: 1412

Essay

As an episodic novel, Carroll’s book offers more insight into the characters and situations they encounter than it does into the story. The events of Alice’s voyage are her interactions with bizarre but very likable personalities, much like a series of nonsensical poems or stories made for their baffling nature or pleasant illogic. The peculiarities of language were a favorite pastime of Carroll’s. Although written for children, Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland is a delightful read for anyone of any age who needs a break from the sometimes depressing and excessively rational world we live in. Carroll is never more himself than when he is tinkering with the English language in a playful or punning way. Even though the book can be read in many different ways, the humor that has made it so popular over the past 100 years may be.

Throughout the novel, it is clear that Dodgson wrote Alice, of the three Liddell sisters, was the closest to him. Actual events inspired the portion about rowing in the warm summer sun. He should have taken the Liddell girls out for picnics and entertained them with stories (Carroll, 1957). When one of these outings began to rain fiercely, they were soaked to the skin. The book’s second chapter, The Pool of Tears, is claimed to have been inspired by this. Three is a recurring pattern that calls attention to itself (Karlsson, 2011). Always remembering the three females, Dodgson relates the tale. As a priest, it could refer to the Christian Trinity or something else entirely.

Alice’s Adventure in Wonderland is an example of an old work illuminating the contemporary. They claim it “continues to amaze us with its modernity” and explores “variations on the gender subject,” which they describe as “amazing.” (Carroll, 1957). The underlying plot, which depicts a girl growing up in upheaval and absurdity, is jarring. Alice’s meetings with lone, curious creatures are almost always one-sided. Neither her family nor the outside world can aid her. Bookcases are mentioned in Lewis Carroll’s depiction of the rabbit-hole tumble. A literary reference may be on his mind. I love Carroll’s clever use of puns and irony; an excellent example is a mad tea party (Nina, 1973). The first Alice novel is lighthearted, whereas the second is more somber. During adolescence, teenagers go through phases where they believe they are fully grownups and then realize they are not. She generally gave herself sound advice (but rarely followed)” is a famous description of Alice’s reticence as an adolescent girl. Comments about adolescent carelessness, restlessness, and nervousness are frequently mentioned.

Another example of maturing is how Alice adjusts to her increasing body size. Using her feet as a guide, she discovers how her body functions in various ways. Her emotions have been shattered (Carroll, 1957). The Cheshire Cat’s statement, “Everyone in Wonderland is mad; otherwise, they would not be down here,” might be interpreted existentially. Is it possible that everyone in the world is insane because they are living, or is it more likely that they are insane because they are dreaming themselves away from reality? The plot revolves around the concept of time. Because “it is always six o’clock and tea-time” at the Hatter’s house, his watch always displays the date. I suppose that the passage of time is essential in the maturation process, although it is unclear whether or not this is the case. His platonic affection for children, or even Mrs. Liddell, may be the focus of the poems in section 12. (Nina, 1973). It is highly plausible. Due to the fact that Alice’s Adventures Underground is the actual headline of the text and its particular translations are ambiguous, it becomes evident that Alice’s world is not just a playground for children but also a terrifying and awful place for maturing. The “underground” portion of the ancient name forces one to consider the Bible.

Moreover, Alice’s desire to visit the Garden of Eden is represented by the lovely garden she wishes to enter. Given his cleric and religious upbringing, it is safe to presume that Dodgson was well-versed in both the biblical stories and Milton’s Paradise Lost (Carroll, 1957). Finally, Alice reaches her destination in the garden and discovers a wicked queen at the top of a deck of cards in charge of it. Is it meant to convey that even the Garden of Eden may be a chaotic place? Or does it simply mean that the garden is not what it seems? (Aihong, 2015). However, it would be cruel to offer even more absurd parallelisms, which is not difficult to do in a children’s narrative of this type.

According to some critics, some of Lewis Carroll’s stories may have been inspired by opium. This chapter is about drug use because of Blue Caterpillar’s smoking habit. These statements are unsupported by facts or proof, and it appears that they are nothing more than wishful thinking on the part of those hoping for more than a fairy tale can offer (Carroll, 1957). It is rather evident that the stories’ visions result from a man’s intellect rather than drug influence. Dodgson’s rich imagination and ability to bring nonsense realms to life make the worlds in his writings a little weird. It is clear he had his share of difficulties, but it does not appear like he was addicted to narcotics (Unn, 2015). At first glance, the story appears filled with much pain. “I have not seen thy sunny face or heard thy silver laughter; No thought of me shall find any space in thy young life’s hereafter,” for example, appears in the sequel, Through the Looking Glass. Dodgson’s longing for Alice as a young girl before she grew up is well conveyed in this scene.

The first narrative may depict a companion growing up and vanishing from one’s life as an adult and, therefore, outside of Dodgson’s influence (Carroll, 1957). The first chapter seems to be a dedication to a buddy whom Dodgson will later lose, and the sequel appears to be an epitaph, given its tone. When Alice’s sister thinks of Alice at the end of the first story, it is evident that this is the case. Last but not least, she imagined her little sister as an older woman, still holding onto the sweet, innocent heart she had as a child (Aihong, 2015). She also imagined herself gathering her other children around her, telling them strange stories, perhaps even telling them about the long-ago dream of Wonderland. She imagined how she would feel as she shared their simple joys and sorrows.

Dodgson appears to be speaking through one of Alice’s sisters as he muses on the girl’s evolution. In the same prologue as the above passage, Dodgson says (Carroll, 1957). Charles Dodgson’s novels reflect his formal education (Unn, 2015). Every one of his fantastical animals has a unique name derived from actual words in the languages of the worlds he creates in his mind. The Dormouse, for example, is a mouse currently dozing off. The Latin term “dormire” means “sleep,” and the rest of the word does not need to be explained.

Deciding or writing a conclusion for an assignment that deals with such complex material are pretty challenging. I have done my best to present a variety of viewpoints. In light of the vastness of the subject and the fact that years of research will likely go by without a definitive conclusion, I advise readers to embrace Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland with an inquisitive attitude and an abundance of common sense. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson’s fondness for children is one of few certainties in life. With the few hints he left there, it is difficult to determine whether his love was sexual or platonic.

Reference

Carroll, Lewis [Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ]. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. 1865. London: Dent & Sons, 1957. Print.

Karlsson, J. (2011). Alice’s Vacillation between Childhood and Adolescence in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Nina Auerbach 1973 Indiana University Press Alice And Wonderland: A Curious Child. Vol. 17, No. 1, The Victorian Child (Sep., 1973), pp. 31-47

Unn Segrén 2015 Lund University Childhood In Wonderland: Child Development In Lewis Carroll’s Books Alice’s Adventure In Wonderland And Through The Looking-Glass

Aihong Ren 2015 the theory and practices in language studies. Power Struggle Between The Adult And Child In Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland. Vol. 5, no. 8 pp. 1659-1663

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