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Buddhists Art in 12th Century, Annotated Bibliography Example

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Annotated Bibliography

“Buddhism and the Art of Psychotherapy by Kawai, Hayao.” Journal of Analytical Psychology 55.4 (2010): 580-581.

According to the article above, it is worth noting that Buddhism started in a style. The India’s first art in the sixteenth century is what market up the begging of Buddhism; literally, this occurred after the death of Buddha. According to the article above, it portrays confident information that Buddhism artwork was in two phase. First, the article affirms that there were Pre-Iconic phases. In addition, here, it is acknowledged that the Buddha was a representation of abstracted symbols and not anthropomorphic figures. It was in this Iconic phase that the article illustrates that human form was supposed to undergo development for the first time.

The article further explains that Buddhism is a two separate strands art in Asia. The first strand according to the article above comprised of the Northern Branch. The Northern branch is said to encompass the Central Asia, Korea together with Japan. In this region, one cannot fail to get Buddhism practices however in a Mahayan form.  Further, the above unknotted article illustrates that the Southern branch encompassed South East region and Sri Lanka. However in this region the article illustrates that the Buddhism practiced here was in the form of Theravada. From the article, it can be acknowledged that those who were practicing Buddhism art did in phase and further it was split in two. That is the Northern section practiced Buddhism that was titled Mahayana whilst the Southern region practiced Buddhism by the name Theravada.  However, they all represented the first scenarios of Buddhism art, with little knowledge on how it will grow bigger today. This is because almost all regions where Buddhism is worshipped, they have constantly portraying the need to stick and be glued to their artwork, which honored Buddha. It honored Buddha because according to the above tilted; this art began after the death of Buddha. In addition, it was named Buddhism, which man y assumes it was after him. Therefore, this is one of the best honor-ship of the late Buddha, affirms the above article.

Couture, Andrea M.. “The Buddhism Project: An Art Review.” Religion and the Arts 8.3 (2004): 358-380

This article on the another hand, affirms that however much this art gave out a perfect peace of art that is worth to be appreciated today, it goes ahead in explaining the first experience of the Art. Notably, the article points out that the first experience of this art works was generally destructive. This is because, according to the article; there were several Muslim invaders all roaming in the Islamic regions. Due to their roaming, this article point out that the subjected invaders destroyed many monasteries of Buddhism as well as the art work itself. This caused the art to drag, since according to the article, by the end of twelfth century, people witnessed it being carried out only in certain selected places in the country. Now with the struggle with the restoration of what had happened, the article explains that this act revived prior to the Founding of the Maha Bodhi Society by Anagarika Dharmapala.  This according to the above article took place in the year 1891. The artwork was restored through building of the temples as well as shrines that earlier own had either been neglected or damaged. It was a good process of restoring the long forgotten efforts of those who remembered and honored Buddha after his death details the article. Just as a fight back into the lost territory, so was the struggle back into the stability of the lost art work, which by then, was greatly valued by the dwellers of the nation.  The article asserts that this was not an easy task; however Anagarika struggled his best to bring people back to the presence and valued piece of the art work.

Ishida, Ichiro, and Delmer M. Brown. “Zen Buddhism and Muromachi Art.” The Journal of Asian Studies 22.4.

As well, this article; affirms that the teaching of Buddha spread all over the Asian after his death, and it went further to the Western world. Over time, the article affirms that dharma, a kind of art work in Buddha evolved gradually with the aim of not letting Buddhism in Japan to wholly find its relation to that of Vietnam’s, Sri Lanka, los Angeles’ and lastly the Tibet’s. However, the article again points out that after a continual push, they lastly found it and started sharing the experiences. The above article has so far concentrated on the rapid growth of the Buddhism over the whole of Asia, before crossing the borders to the west.

Poor, Robert, and Takaaki Sawa. “Art in Japanese Esoteric Buddhism..” The Journal of Asian Studies 32.3.

It the same way as illustrated by art second article above, this article also acknowledges the fact that Buddhism disappeared from India for while despite of it thrilling over the rest of the Asia. It was disheartening to understand that the motherland of the art is diminishing as the rest of the regions heightened. However, the article further affirms that the British ruler in ninetieth century took on the rod of rebuilding the temple, hence encouraging though on a gradual motion, and thus the revival of the art.

The act of restoration according to the above article was clearing up of sands, and at the same time planting trees that the millennia in Sri Lanka had nurtured. Accordingly, the article demonstrates that after the art had gained enlightenment, the Buddhist got the urge to spend many hours in the temple meditating about Budha Gaya, after which they tried to get ways in which they could further spread his teachings. This act attracted many pilgrims who later on travelled to this place, all in the efforts of winning a chance to be included among the 1002 worshippers.

Wilson, Professor. “Art. XIII.—On Buddha and Buddhism.” Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain & Ireland 16 : 229-265.

Around 250 BC, the article explains that this is the time, which Emperor Ashoka, who by then was the Indian ruler managed to put up a complex at Bodha Gaya. It was build and later under went a certain renovation, and prior to the time of building, it was offered a certain type of shape, where it was a pyramid like structure. However, the article, explains that despite of the shape, many felt comfortable in worshipping in the temple, hence the current form of the Buddhism buildings. This article also does not leave out the fact that many of the earliest images of Buddhism resembling most of European figures. This is because, since a British spearheaded the re-building of Buddhism back, the same got the power to musher in many missionaries. The missionaries were the ones who were in the thrown of controlling most of the Buddha’s’ worship. It was through this that they took control of manipulating the Indians in their own way, hence penetrating British figures and images into their country all in the name of re-establishing the long lost Buddhism art.

Works Cited

“Buddhism and the Art of Psychotherapy by Kawai, Hayao.” Journal of Analytical Psychology 55.4 (2010): 580-581.

Couture, Andrea M.. “The Buddhism Project: An Art Review.” Religion and the Arts 8.3 (2004): 358-380.

Ishida, Ichiro, and Delmer M. Brown. “Zen Buddhism and Muromachi Art.” The Journal of Asian Studies 22.4 (2009): 417.

Poor, Robert, and Takaaki Sawa. “Art in Japanese Esoteric Buddhism..” The Journal of Asian Studies 32.3 (2011): 517.

Wilson, Professor. “Art. XIII.—On Buddha and Buddhism.” Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain & Ireland 16 (2007): 229-265.

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