Lincoln’s Position on Slavery, Essay Example

Lincoln’s views on slavery were significant to secession and the start of the Civil War subsequent to his election. Did his views change during the course of the war? If so, how? If not, why not? 

The position of Abraham Lincoln against the existence of slavery in the United States during the time of his administrational guidance was strong. It defined what path his government is taking especially in the aspect of hoping to unite the nation in the middle of a huge division among its states. Such consideration is often considered by historians as the basis of most of the arguments he presented in relation to how he intended to protect and promote what the distinctive existence of the constitution. Considering what the law provides and insists on the people he was in need of giving assistance to, Lincoln was so certain that slavery was something that the constitution does not support.

Nevertheless, because of the situations developing during the Civil War, being a republican, the view of Lincoln was slightly realigned towards keeping America for the Americans. This means specifically giving the land to the ‘lords’. He was then coined as a person who is a racist, and yet is also hypocrite hoping to impose anti-slavery bills. To Lincoln though, his desires were sincere although it did go against his political position as a republican. Hence, to make an implicative balance between his position about slavery and his political bearings as a republican, he simply focused on the principles of democracy and further promoted its base ground to make sure that the American society would grow into a more democratic nation, which hopefully would abolish the existence of slavery among the people.

This particular path that Lincoln took specifically allowed him to become the epitome of democracy not only in America but around the globe as well. Notably, such consideration on the path of his governance specifically paved the way to giving birth to a slavery-free nation of a free United States of America; a considerable condition it is known for up to these days.

Reference:

Schulz, K.M. (2012). The Impending Crisis. Cengage Learning.