Back to School Offer

Get 20% of Your First Order amount back in Reward Credits!

Get 20% of Your First Orderback in Rewards

All papers examples
Get a Free E-Book! ($50 Value)
HIRE A WRITER!
Paper Types
Disciplines
Get a Free E-Book! ($50 Value)

The Process of Language Arts, Essay Example

Pages: 4

Words: 987

Essay

Development in elementary-aged children

Between the ages of five and twelve, most children pass through a process that builds upon and increases their ability to read, write, speak, listen, view, and visually represent in relation to language arts and literacy. As T.G. Gunning relates, these six basic elements start to develop in infancy and “progressively become more refined as a child amasses a foundation of oral language, written language, and life experiences,” both inside and outside of the school environment (2010, p. 23).

Clearly, the skills associated with reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing are all dependent upon one another, meaning that reading also involves listening, such as hearing the words while reading a page in a book. Reading also involves speaking, such as reading out loud from the page of a book. In addition, a child views the words or images on the printed page and visually represents the words or images by drawing a picture that represents a complete thought or some type of an image in a picture book.

As the basic building blocks for language arts and literacy in elementary-aged children, all six of these elements are required for the ability to communicate effectively and although some children experience difficulties related to combining the written word with speaking, most by the age of eight or at the third grade level have mastered the basic language arts and are able to use all six of the elements to effectively express themselves in the classroom and at home.

Most professional educators and instructors agree that reading is the keystone for the development of language arts and literacy in elementary-aged children, starting roughly at the first grade level and progressing to the sixth grade level. As T. Salinger points out, reading can be defined as having the capacity to decipher words written in a particular language that represent meaning, connotation, and denotation (1988, p. 154). Reading also incorporates the ability to understand and comprehend the meaning of a word when pronounced or as a symbol and how words are strung together to create sentences and thoughts (Salinger, 1998, p. 155).

For the most part, the development of the ability to read in children begins in infancy through pictures and images that symbolize persons, events, and situations, such as in a picture book, and then progresses to reading itself which can be defined as a process that allows a child to transpose an abstract symbol into a coherent thought which usually occurs at about three years of age.

Much like reading, the ability to write occurs in children at about the same time or around the age of three and then progresses into various levels of achievement and mastery which by the age of eight or so is sufficiently developed to allow the child to express him/herself in words, sentences, and complete thoughts. As J.K. Thompson reminds us, when a child attains the second grade level, he/she should possess a rather large vocabulary and be able to effectively communicate through concrete ideas and complex thought patterns (2003, p. 167).

Perhaps the most difficult and developmentally complex of the six language arts is speaking which normally commences around the age of two and like reading and writing progresses to the point where a child can express him/herself verbally. Salinger adds that most children can effectively communicate verbally by the time they reach three age of five; however, some elementary-aged children require instruction in speaking, perhaps due to not fully understanding the meaning of some words when spoken (1988, p. 167) and the inability to visualize words in thought before speaking them. In essence then, by the age of six, a child should be able to orally communicate via a large and varied vocabulary based on what he/she has heard in school and the home environment.

As an adjunct to speaking, listening is undoubtedly the earliest element to arise in a child, perhaps as young as six months of age, which then continually develops through the elementary school years. Most professional educators consider listening as the primary language arts skill, due to the fact that a child will not be able to effectively communicate if the speaking element is not fully developed by the age of eight at the third grade level. Of course, if a child cannot communicate properly through speaking, the ability to listen becomes somewhat redundant.

As to viewing, G.G. Greene maintains that this element “exceeds the ability to listen by several years, meaning that a child’s capacity to view the world around him begins at birth and develops rapidly” (2001, p. 215). Greene also points out that the ability to recognize visual images, such as the picture of a dog or the face of one’s mother, begins quite early and proceeds into the ability to make a connection between the visual image and spoken and written words that describe the image which occurs around the age of two (2001, p. 218).

This also holds true for the ability to visually represent or transpose information and ideas into a visual image or representation, such as drawing the picture of a lion based on what a child imagines it might look like in real life. More often than not, these visual representations are accompanied by writing and speaking as a sort of three-way communication process (Greene, 2001, p. 221). Thus, all six of the language arts and literacy elements–reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing–are interconnected and depend upon one another via a symbiotic relationship which in most children is fully developed by the age of twelve or the sixth grade level.

References

Greene, G.G. (2001). The development of the language arts from birth through    elementary school. 9th ed. New York: Professional Educators Publications.

Gunning T. G. (2010). Creating literacy instruction for all students. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Salinger, T. (1988). Language arts and literacy for young children. New York: Charles Merrill Publishing Company.

Thompson, J.K. (2003). The Language Arts and Elementary-Aged Children. New York: Prentice-Hall Publishers.

Time is precious

Time is precious

don’t waste it!

Get instant essay
writing help!
Get instant essay writing help!
Plagiarism-free guarantee

Plagiarism-free
guarantee

Privacy guarantee

Privacy
guarantee

Secure checkout

Secure
checkout

Money back guarantee

Money back
guarantee

Related Essay Samples & Examples

Samples, Power Analysis, and Design Sensitivity Samples, Power Analysis, and Design Sensitivity, Essay Example

Compare and contrast internal and external validity. Describe and give examples of research questions for which external validity is a primary concern. Describe and give [...]

Pages: 5

Words: 1457

Essay

Business Responses, Essay Example

Idealized Attributes From the average above, I found out that the leader sometimes posses idealized attribute’s form of transformational leadership. This means that followers do [...]

Pages: 2

Words: 460

Essay

Types of Power, Essay Example

The videos taught me that there is not only one type of power but five types of powers which are referent power, reward power, legitimate [...]

Pages: 2

Words: 602

Essay

Criminal Justice: Juveniles, Essay Example

Juveniles are treated differently as compared to adult criminals. This is because most juveniles engage in petty cases and are not fully matured as to [...]

Pages: 3

Words: 769

Essay

Harris/Jardines Questions, Essay Example

Part One The issue of law considered by Kagan in this case is whether or not a drug detection dog’s alert during a traffic stop [...]

Pages: 3

Words: 772

Essay

Management Week 1 Assignment 3, Essay Example

We would like to own a Bed and Breakfast in the hill country outside of Austin, overlooking the beautiful Lake Austin.  It would be a [...]

Pages: 2

Words: 485

Essay

Samples, Power Analysis, and Design Sensitivity Samples, Power Analysis, and Design Sensitivity, Essay Example

Compare and contrast internal and external validity. Describe and give examples of research questions for which external validity is a primary concern. Describe and give [...]

Pages: 5

Words: 1457

Essay

Business Responses, Essay Example

Idealized Attributes From the average above, I found out that the leader sometimes posses idealized attribute’s form of transformational leadership. This means that followers do [...]

Pages: 2

Words: 460

Essay

Types of Power, Essay Example

The videos taught me that there is not only one type of power but five types of powers which are referent power, reward power, legitimate [...]

Pages: 2

Words: 602

Essay

Criminal Justice: Juveniles, Essay Example

Juveniles are treated differently as compared to adult criminals. This is because most juveniles engage in petty cases and are not fully matured as to [...]

Pages: 3

Words: 769

Essay

Harris/Jardines Questions, Essay Example

Part One The issue of law considered by Kagan in this case is whether or not a drug detection dog’s alert during a traffic stop [...]

Pages: 3

Words: 772

Essay

Management Week 1 Assignment 3, Essay Example

We would like to own a Bed and Breakfast in the hill country outside of Austin, overlooking the beautiful Lake Austin.  It would be a [...]

Pages: 2

Words: 485

Essay

Get a Free E-Book ($50 in value)

Get a Free E-Book

How To Write The Best Essay Ever!

How To Write The Best Essay Ever!